David Destroys the Amalekites / Jesus’ Empty Tomb: May 31st 2021

The Philistine commanders questioned the loyalty of David. He had killed many Philistines in his time from their champion, Goliath, to the two hundred he had slaughtered just to harvest their foreskins. Achish, the Philistine king, was pleased with David (1 Samuel 29: 9) but instructed him not to go into battle with them and turn back to the land of the Philistines. This was fortuitous. David was destined to be the ruler of Israel and so it was sensible for him not to have the blood of Israelites on his hands.

David returned to the Philistine town where he lived, Ziklag, only to find that the evil Amalekites had raided it in his absence, set it on fire and carried off all their families including David’s two wives. David’s men talked about stoning him because he had left their families unprotected.

David asked the Lord, utilising the ephod (priestly apron), whether he should pursue the Amalekites and God told him he would be successful in this rescue mission. David and his six hundred men set off in pursuit but he had to leave two hundred men at a ravine because they were exhausted. David found an escaped slave, gave him food and drink and he then led them to the Amalekite raiders.

David fought the Amalekites, rescued all his people and took their flocks and herds. Some of his men did not want to share the spoils of their battle with the two hundred exhausted men who had not fought but David over-ruled them and gave everyone an equal share (1 Samuel 30:24-25). David also shared some of the plunder with the elders of Judah and all the other places who had been kind to David while he roamed in the desert.

In summary, God stopped David from attacking the Israelites which would have looked very bad on his CV. David then started acting in a much more regal and responsible fashion. He asked God what he should do. He bravely went off to rescue his subjects. He fed and sheltered a refugee. He nearly wiped out one of God’s least favourite nations. He was kind to all his people – even the exhausted ones who could not fight. He was generous with his resources in order to forge closer alliances with friendly neighbours. This was a very promising chapter in David’s gradual development just as Saul is about to meet his demise.

The Philistines fought against Israel and all Saul’s sons were killed, including David’s best friend Jonathan. Saul was critically injured and fell on his own sword. The Israelites abandoned their towns and fled. It was a total slaughter, which God had sensibly kept David from participating in. The Philistines put the armour of Saul in the temple of their demonic fertility deity. They fastened his headless body, and the bodies of his sons, to the wall of a town called Beth Shan. Despite the danger, the Israelites from Jabesh Gilead were not prepared to accept this final insult to their king and they valiantly journeyed through the night to retrieve the bodies, cremate them and bury them. They then fasted seven days out of respect.

The first king of Israel, Saul, had died. He had started well but fell out with God due to his disobedience and eventually plunged to a new low in spiritual relations by consulting a witch. However, even people he unjustly persecuted, like David, had still respected him. The Israelites were grieved to see him go despite his faults. Both Saul and his son Jonathan were tremendous warriors and they were loved and gracious (2 Sam. 1:23). Israel would now enter a period of civil war to determine the next unifying king of Israel.

John 19:28-20:9

Jesus, while suffering on the cross, was given a drink of vinegar, which fulfilled the prophecy in Psalms 69.21.

When Jesus died, he made us righteous in the sight of God by taking all our past, present and future sins on him. He became sin for our salvation and broke its power: ‘It is finished’. Jesus breathed out his spirit as he died (John 19:30). Jesus’ spirit now lives within all baptised and believing Christians.

To check he was dead, the soldiers pierced Jesus’ side and there was ‘a sudden flow of blood and water’ (John 19:34). Crucifixion is a horrible death and during the process: ‘the decreased oxygen (due to the difficulty in exhaling) causes damage to the tissues and the capillaries begin leaking watery fluid from the blood into the tissues. This results in a build-up of fluid around the heart (pericardial effusion) and lungs (pleural effusion)’. Jesus probably literally died from a broken heart as the lack of oxygen in the body of a victim of crucifixion can cause the heart to burst. Jesus had been betrayed by the people he had come to save. Even though he revealed God to us as the God of love and he never sinned, he died due to our sin / envy / jealousy and hatred.

https://www.apu.edu/articles/the-science-of-the-crucifixion/#:~:text=When%20they%20came%20to%20Jesus,surrounding%20the%20heart%20and%20lungs.

The blood and water from Jesus’ side fell onto the ground of Golgotha and soaked Adam’s buried bones. Jesus’ life was in the blood. Jesus told us the Holy Spirit, now living within us, would give us streams of living water. ‘The water flowing from the heart of Jesus will heal, cleanse and energise us all’ (NG, p.317) Jesus would then descend into hell and rescue his old friends, Adam and Eve, from their chains.

Jesus’ body was taken by his uncle, Joseph of Arimathea. He and Nicodemus wrapped Jesus’ body with spices (myrrh and aloes) in strips of linen and laid his body in a new tomb.

On the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene found that the stone had been removed from the entrance to the tomb. She told Simon Peter and John and they both ran to the tomb.

Simon Peter saw the strips of linen that had covered Jesus’ body lying there as well as ‘the burial cloth that had been around Jesus’ head’ (John 20:7). This cloth has been preserved through the millennia as a holy relic and is known as the ‘Sudarium of Oviedo’. Both the Shroud of Turin – the cloth that wrapped up Jesus’ body and the Sudarium – the cloth that covered his head prior to the shroud – have been proved to have been in contact with each other and both have traces of myrrh and aloes on them.

Simon Peter ‘saw and believed’ (John 20:8). We are especially blessed these days when we believe without seeing (John 20:29).

Psalm 68:28-35

When we pray with faith and pray in the Spirit, God will show us his healing and delivering strength.

As the gospel has spread to the ends of the earth, the global faithful have sung praise to God.

We need to continue to proclaim God’s awesome power (Psalm 68:34).

The awesome Holy Spirit resides inside of us on account of our baptism. He gives power and strength to us, his people. To release his power through us, we must pray he blesses us with a full measure of gifts and pray in faith for others (Ps. 68:35).

Image: https://pixabay.com/photos/empty-tomb-nazareth-israel-3326100/

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