Asa King of Judah / Paul and Silas in Prison: June June 25th 2021

1 Kings 14:21-16:7

The book of 1 Kings now starts alternating between the successive kings of the Northern part of the divided country (the region called ‘Israel’) and the successive kings of the South (the region called ‘Judah’), where Jerusalem was situated. It is mainly a story of abject failure to follow God’s laws.

Rehoboam, son of Solomon, was king of Judah. He was crowned at the age of forty-one and reigned for seventeen years. His mother was an Ammonite. The Ammonites were descended from Ben-Ammi, who was the son of Lot’s youngest daughter. After Lot and his two daughters had escaped from Sodom, his daughters got their father, Lot, drunk every night and had sex with him until they both fell pregnant. The oldest daughter gave birth to Moab, from whom the Moabites were descended. Both the Ammonites and Moabites had been conceived by incest (Gen.19:36-38).

Under Rehoboam’s rule, the country committed evil and angered God even more than it had done under Solomon. The Judeans set up heathen worship sites and had sex with prostitutes in the religious shrines. Their culture had been completely contaminated by the remnants of the indigenous tribes they had failed to exterminate from the promised land (1 Kings 14:24).

In the fifth year of Rehoboam’s rule, the king of Egypt attacked Jerusalem. He ransacked the temple and the palace, carrying off all the gold and treasures. Solomon had wisely protected his kingdom by marrying Pharaoh’s daughter. Without political alliances, Israel and Judah were threatened by powerful neighbours. Instead of the gold shields that Solomon’s guard had used, they now had to use bronze shields. The kingdom was going downhill with continual warfare against the Northern kingdom (Israel) ruled by the evil Jeroboam.

Abijah became king of Judah after Rehoboam. He only reigned for three years. He committed all the same sins as his father Rehoboam. God was after a king whose heart was fully devoted to him, as the heart of David had been. David had not failed to keep the Lord’s commands all the days of his life – apart from his adulterous affair with the wife of Uriah the Hittite, whom David had murdered (1 Kings 15:5).

After Abijah came Asa. He reigned for forty-one years. He was a breath of fresh air as he obeyed the Lord (1 Kings 15:11). He expelled the shrine-prostitutes and got rid of his father’s idols. He even deposed the evil queen mother, his grandmother, because of her worship of a Canaanite fertility deity. Even though he didn’t manage to remove the high places, Asa’s heart was fully committed to God (1 Kings 15:14).

Asa’s Southern kingdom of Judah was still at war with the North (Israel) now ruled by King Baasha. Asa wisely bought a tactical alliance with the powerful king of Damascus, Ben-Hadad, using all his remaining treasure. Ben-Hadad captured enemy towns in Israel forcing King Baasha to withdraw from threatening Judah’s borders.

Meanwhile, in Israel, Nadab became king after Jeroboam but only reigned for two years before being assassinated by Baasha. Baasha fulfilled the word of the prophet Ahijah (1 Kings 14:10-11) by killing Jeroboam’s entire family. This was because of the sins Jeroboam had personally committed and had also caused Israel, the country under his rule, to commit.

Baasha continued to commit the same sins as Jeroboam had done and so a prophet, Jehu, prophesied that he and his family would meet the same disastrous end (1 Kings 16:3). He had lived by the sword and would die by the sword.

Throughout the book of Kings, the rulers of both Israel and Judah were judged by God on their actions and the attitudes of their hearts. God was always comparing them to David, a man after God’s own heart. Only Asa, king of Judah, has measured up to this ideal so far, which is why God allowed him to rule for forty-one years. Evil rulers had far shorter reigns.

Acts 16:16-40

A slave girl who was possessed by an evil fortune-telling spirit kept following Paul and the rest of the disciples. She made a great deal of money for her owners. Evil spirits can’t actually tell you the future. Only God knows the future. However, because demons are immensely clever, they can generally predict the future, working it out from knowledge of people’s behaviour and habits. They also have access to hidden knowledge / lists of people’s sins and can make events happen in the future to match their predictions. If a fortune teller predicts that someone will have a car crash next week, they could send a demon to cause the crash. Christians are not allowed to consult fortune tellers but if one forced a negative prediction on us like that, we should pray to God that he will send his holy angels to prevent it from happening. The fortune telling girl following the disciples simply identified who the disciples were and what they were doing. This was common knowledge amongst all the local evil spirits working together in an evil hierarchy (Acts 16:17)

Paul became so troubled by the slave girl that he ordered the spirit to come out of her (Acts 16:18). The spirit obeyed. For a successful exorcism, the person being prayed for usually has to want to be freed and so we can assume the slave girl kept following the disciples because she wanted liberation.

The owners of the slave girl were furious to have lost their income and so had the magistrates strip and beat Paul and Silas and throw them into prison. They were put in the inner cell with their feet in stocks. Paul and Silas were irrepressible and were praying and singing to God at midnight when there was a violent earthquake. All the prison doors flew open and everybody’s chains came loose. The other prisoners had been listening to Paul and Silas all evening and so their spiritual shackles may well have come loose too.

The jailer was going to kill himself thinking all his prisoners had escaped but Paul reassured him (Acts 16:28). He asked the apostles what he must do to be saved. Paul replied: ‘Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you will be saved – you and all your household’ (Acts 16:31). They told him and his family the gospel message, The jailer washed their wounds and he and his family were baptized. They seized the chance while the apostles were there. They recognised the chance for salvation and the whole family were filled with joy, because they had come to believe in God. The jailer had been in spiritual jail because of sin. The blood of Jesus washed him and family clean and gave them eternal freedom and life.

The magistrates ordered Paul and Silas to be released in the morning but they refused to go. They had a surprise for the corrupt magistrates, they were Roman citizens and should not have been treated so disrespectfully. The magistrates had to come personally to appease them and escort them from the prison. They ‘requested’ that they should leave the city rather than demanded it.

Paul and Silas went back to Lydia’s house and encouraged the other believers with their incredible testimony before leaving.

God brought some good out of the disciples being thrown into jail. Not only did the fellow inmates hear from the apostles, but also an entire family was saved. The jailer would then have been able to talk about Jesus to all future prisoners. Prison can be a place of wonderful spiritual renewal where people at their lowest ebb can finally find God. We might get a chance to visit a prison one day and think that we will be bringing Jesus in with us. However, we will find that Jesus is already there.

Proverbs 15:21-30

Unlike the foolish king Rehoboam, we should listen to many wise counsellors and actually act on their advice (Prov.15:22). When we are wise, we will stick to the straight path of life that leads upwards.

The Lord tears down the proud man’s house. He doesn’t like greed and He detests the thoughts of wicked people. He is far from them.

Jesus Christ made us righteous with God through his death on the cross and so God will hear our prayers (Prov.15:29).

We should weigh our answers and delight in a holy, timely and apt reply.

We should remain cheerful at all times, just as Paul and Silas did when sitting sit-by-side in stocks in the prison (Prov.15:30). Their cheerful songs and looks brought joy to the heart of other prisoners. The good news of the Gospel brought everlasting life to their jailer and his family.

Image: Distant Shores Media/Sweet Publishing, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0&gt;, via Wikimedia Commons

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