Amos: The Nation to be Destroyed and then Restored / Paul: Death through Adam, Life Through Christ

Amos 8:1-9:15

God showed Amos a basket of ripe fruit that indicated that ‘the time is ripe for my people Israel; I will spare them no longer’ (Amos 8:2). The Israelites would suffer for trampling the needy, doing away with the poor and cheating people with dishonest scales. God doesn’t like greed and injustice.

God would send a new kind of famine – not of lack of food or a thirst for water – but a famine of hearing the words of the Lord (Amos 8:11). Many people in this country choose to live in a faith famine during their spiritually empty, hedonistic lifestyle. Until something terrible happens to them and they experience illness, addiction or the death of someone close to them they won’t search for the word of the Lord.

God is very angry at the Israelites and is going to ruthlessly hunt down all the sinners throughout the kingdom, no matter where they try to hide. God definitely has a hard edge and we don’t want to annoy him. When we are friends with God we find comfort that he is omnipresent and with us to the ends of the earth. Unrepentant sinners are terrified to find out they cannot escape the clutches of God. ‘I will fix my eyes upon them for evil and not for good’ (Amos 9:4). The relationship between God and evil is a difficult topic. Some pastors gloss over this with a childish ‘God is good’ and ‘devil is bad’ simplicity. However, the devil is not allowed to do anything unless God has permitted him to do so. God is in charge of everything that takes place. The devil is constrained in his actions (or we would all be dead already) and so if something bad is happening in your life, it is because God has loosened the restraints on the devil to allow it to take place. Allowing something to take place or neglecting to stop it when you have the power (and God has all the power) is the same as doing it yourself. So we can safely conclude that God allows both good and evil events, even though he wants us all to live in love and peace. When God allows evil to happen it is because he wants a greater good to come out of it.

We can see the horrors of the holocaust in Amos 9:2-4 with the Jews driven into exile and slayed by the sword. Wherever they hid, the Jewish people were hunted down and slayed. It is a terrifying prophecy.

God was going to shake Israel as grain is shaken in a sieve to remove the rubbish. All the complacent sinners would be sifted out to die by the sword.  

Eventually, God would restore Israel and bring his exiled people back – as he demonstrated in 1948. The Israelis rebuilt cities, planted vineyards and ate their own fruit (Amos 9:14).

Shepherds play a key role in the history of Israel. Amos, a shepherd turned prophet, predicted exile followed by restoration. Jeremiah prophesied that the bad shepherds of the Israelites would be punished and that God himself would gather the remnant of his flock from exile. God would place good shepherds over them to tend them until the ultimate good shepherd, Jesus, would be born (Jer.23:5). As soon as baby Jesus had been born, the shepherds in the fields near Bethlehem were called by the angels to pay homage to the king of all shepherds.  

No matter how hostile their neighbours are, aggression against Israel will always be pointless as God has replanted his holy people in their own land, that he had given them ‘never again to be uprooted’ (Amos 9:15).

Romans 5:12-21

Sin entered the world through one man, Adam and we all retain part of his damaged nature, a tendency to choose sin. Death came through sin and reigned from the time of Adam to the time of Moses, when the law was given. We were all condemned by the single sin of Adam but we have been redeemed by Jesus, the new Adam.

God’s gift of grace came after millions of sins and brought justification (Romans 5:16). Death was able to spread through the whole human race by Adam’s sin, but Jesus’ death gives us abundant life through God’s endless provision of grace and gift of righteousness. We are no longer guilty and condemned in God’s sight once we are baptized and believe in Jesus. Through God’s priceless gift of grace, he has made us his adopted children, co-heirs with his son and he remains pleased with us.

The people of the world are no longer condemned to death as we were due to Adam’s sin. Our justification by the blood of Jesus has brought eternal life to all people through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.  

Proverbs 17:15-24

God detests injustice (Prov.17:15). We should never accept bribes to pervert the course of justice (Prov.17:23).

We won’t prosper if we have perverse hearts and deceitful tongues (Prov.17:20). After becoming baptized, we need to ask the Holy Spirit living within us to sanctify us, to day-by-day gradually drive the perversity out of our hearts.

True friends are exceedingly precious and may be more help in adversity than many members of our family. True friends can be rare and often we can only count our married partner as a true friend.  Men often have acquaintances rather than ‘friends’. They share a hobby or pastime together and this might just be football or drinking. It is very rare to have a friendship like David had with Saul’s son, Jonathan. They were friends that loved at all times (Prov.17:17). David was a man after God’s own heart and so would have avoided picking quarrels with his friend (Prov.17:19).    

Foolish people do not bring joy to their parents and they waste money. They have no desire to get wisdom. We should pray the Holy Spirit each day to receive wisdom and to esteem it more than gold. ‘A discerning man keeps wisdom in view’ (Prov.17:24).

Being cheerful makes us healthy. If our spirit is crushed, an evil spirit of trauma can latch onto us and prolong our grief. Evil spirits want us to destroy ourselves and those around us. We need to attend a Spirit-filled church to praise and worship God and to receive prayer for inner healing.

Amos: Woe to the complacent / Paul: Peace and Joy: July 18th 2021

Amos 6:1-7:17

Woe to those who are complacent! (Amos 6:1). Many people feel complacent and secure these days and see no point in worshipping the One True God, creator of heaven and earth. They lounge on couches, enjoy their barbeques, hum along to secular music, use the finest lotions and drink like fish but do not grieve over the state of our country or God’s people; how we kill over 200,000 of our unborn children each year and churches close due to selfish disinterest. They will be among ‘the first to go into exile’ (Amos 6:7). Their feasting and lounging will end at the day of judgement.

God hates false pride. People think they have achieved success in their lives without any help from God. They brag and network with other narcissists about their careers on social media. People live in big houses and think they are secure yet we live behind panes of glass through which anyone armed with the smallest rock could enter. Pride comes before a dramatic fall. We need to praise and thank God every day for our blessings.

We are like wonky walls badly constructed by cowboy builders. I was built on a strong sold foundation having been baptised at the age of one. However, my family were not strong believers and, as I grew, I went askew. When I assessed the constructed wall of my life, it contained twisted and warped bricks that had thrown my life off-plumb. I see teenagers now at church who have thrived under strong Christian parents who are beautifully constructed beacons of light.

The Lord showed Amos that Israel had not been built to his plumbline. The country was warped, twisted and shoddy in its faith and morals. God would destroy its pagan worship sites and send armed raiders to plunder its cities and exile its people.

Amaziah, the priest of the idol-worship shrine at Bethel, complained to King Jeroboam II about Amos. Amaziah told Amos to go back to Judah. Amos explained that it hadn’t been his idea to be a prophet. God had taken him from herding sheep and looking after sycamores and told him to prophesy to Israel (Amos 7:15) that it would go into exile.

Amos had an even worse personal prophecy for the corrupt priest (Amos 17:17).

Amaziah recognised Amos as a ‘seer’ (Amos 17:12) but did not want to listen to his truthful bad news. Many people today try to blot out hearing the gospel and avoid priests as they know they would convict their self-centred lifestyle. However, God’s soldiers will not go away as we have been commanded to share the word of God. We need to all stop hiding from the truth and listen. Then God can work within us and heal us. God can change his mind about destroying our country and our people if we repent and turn to him. He is always calling us home to him.

Romans 4:16-5:11

In the sight of God, Abraham is the father of us all. Abraham has been made the father of many nations. Abraham believed through faith that he could still be a father even though ‘his body was as good as dead’ (Rom.4:19).

God credits us with righteousness – as he did for Abraham – when ‘we believe in him who raised Jesus our Lord from the dead’ (Rom.4:24). Jesus was ‘delivered over to death’ as a ransom payment for our sins and was ‘raised to life for our justification’ so we become innocent in God’s eyes as if we were a freshly baptized child (Rom.4:25). We become clothed in a spotless white robe as if we had never sinned.

Having been justified by God’s grace through faith, we are now at peace with God (Rom.5:1). We were previously at war, but peace has come through our Lord Jesus Christ.

As Christians we should rejoice in our sufferings because out of them we gain perseverance, character and hope. God has given us the Holy Spirit, who has poured God’s love into our hearts.

While we were still sinners, Christ died for us’ (Rom.5:8). He saw the potential in us if love were to be poured into our hearts and we were made right with God.

We were reconciled to God through Jesus’ death. But Jesus came back to life. He walks with us, encourages us, intercedes for us and along with the Father sends us the Holy Spirit, who sanctifies us. As we are now God’s adopted children, we can rejoice in God. Jesus bore all of God’s wrath on the cross for us and there is now no wrath left for believers (MacArthur, 2021, 1551).

Psalm 86:11-17

If we have a divided heart, we should pray to God to make it whole, so that we will be in awe of the Lord. Then we can praise God with all our heart (Ps.86:12).

The Holy Spirit teaches us the way of God, so that we can walk in the truth (Ps.86:11).  

Jesus died on the cross in order to deliver us from the depths of the grave (Ps.86:13). After he died, he descended into hell and rescued Adam and Eve out of his great love for them. He was their creator and their redeemer, yet was also one of their descendants.

God sent his son to die for us because He is slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness (Ps.86:15). He turned to us and had mercy on us.

When I have been laid low and attacked by oppressive thoughts or insolent people, God has always shown me the way out. He has placed people in the right place to help me and curated magazine and newspaper articles to guide me. He continues to be my helper and my comforter (Ps.86:17).

Image: Image by Pete Linforth from Pixabay

Amos Calls Israel to Repentance / Paul suggests Abraham was Justified by Faith: July 17th 2021

Amos 5:1-27

Amos lamented over Israel and called the people to repentance. They would no longer win their battles. If the Israelites in a city marched out to war, only ten per cent would survive. The people should seek the Lord and live rather than travel to their idol-worshipping shrines (Amos 5:4). Their main shrine, Bethel, would be reduced to nothing.

Amos convicted the Israelites of their lack of justice and righteousness. They despised those who told the truth and reproved them in court. They oppressed the poor and took their grain and so would not be allowed to enjoy their mansions and lush vineyards.

The prudent man was being forced to keep silent during these evil times as there was no justice in the courts. The righteous were oppressed and bribery was common.

The Israelites should ‘seek good, not evil’ (Amos 5:14) and ‘hate evil, love good’ (Amos 5:15). They should maintain justice in the courts. People are blessed when they live in a society with a relatively just legal system. In our country, justice often prevails and there are also ways to appeal. Justice at lower levels such as magistrates court can easily become warped by secret fraternal societies, letting their members off lightly. However, these people will face justice in the end as members of such societies are automatically excommunicated from the Christian church and so will bitterly repent of their actions for eternity as they remain separated from God.

There would be wailing throughout the land as the Lord passed through their midst. People longing for the day of the Lord would not enjoy it when it arrived. They would be judged in pitch-black darkness not light.

God despised their religious feasts and refused to accept their offerings. He would not listen to their music, God demanded justice and righteousness (Amos 5:24). Because of their idol worship, which included child sacrifice, God would send them into exile ‘beyond Damascus’ (Amos 5:27). The Israelites would soon be conquered by the Assyrians (722 BC) and deported in accordance with this prophecy.

We need to be careful not to feel satisfied with our worship – particularly the lukewarm washed-out worship offered by many churches. God wants us to worship him from our hearts, not as a reluctant religious gathering devoid of love and power.     

Romans 4:1-15

We have a conflict in our theology today. Paul quotes Genesis that ‘Abraham believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness’ (Rom.4:1-15). Some pastors explain this using a credit and debit card analogy. They say that believers were all made righteous with God through the death of Jesus on the cross. Abraham lived before Jesus but he was made righteous through his faith by borrowing against the death of Jesus, gaining eternal life on credit. Jesus would eventually pay off Abraham’s credit-card bill by his blood. As we live after the death of Jesus, we can draw on Jesus’ death using a holy debit card. The righteousness is in the bank and we can draw on it,

This is the big debate about whether we can get to heaven based solely on faith or whether we need to both have faith and also live a good life demonstrating love and charity. James wrote clearly that faith alone is not enough to save us, it has to be backed up by deeds (James 2:14). Faith without deeds is useless. Many people don’t understand that time is perceived differently by God. He sees the past, present and future all at the same time. Abraham was considered righteous by offering his son Isaac on the altar. His faith and deeds worked together and his faith was made complete by what he did (James 2:21-22). We have to make our faith complete by what we do. So when Abraham first spoke to God, he was indeed credited with righteousness but only up to the point where he almost sacrificed his son (James 2:23-24). James clearly states that ‘a person is considered righteous by what they do and not by faith alone’ (James 2:24). Faith is a channel through which justification comes. Faith is also an unearned gift from God.

The necessity for both faith and deeds has always been the belief of the Mother Church for 1,500 years until the Reformation at which time the Protestant Reformers cut seven books out of the Bible (the Apocrypha). This conveniently removed some of the key texts about doctrines they did not agree with such as praying for the dead and purgatory (2 Maccabees 12:41-46).

By eliminating the Apocrypha, a further reference to the necessity for both faith and deeds was removed: “Was not Abraham tested and found faithful, was that not considered as justifying him?” (1 Maccabees 2:52) (NJB 1985).   

If anyone tells us it is not in the Bible to pray for the dead, that there is no purgatory and that we can gain salvation without good deeds, we can simply point out that their Bible is not big enough. They are missing seven books.

It is the sin of presumption to assume we are saved and will go to heaven. The church does not know who will go to heaven, that is down to the judgement of Jesus and his righteous justice. When we die we have to trust in his mercy. The faith and deeds debate shouldn’t really be an issue as ‘born again’ Christians brimming full of faith tend to do good deeds anyway. However, if we are lukewarm Christians plodding along in a self-centred life, with minimum thought or love for God, we need to fire ourselves up and do some of the acts of charity that Jesus instructed us to do. The ones that will stop us being sent off into the eternal fire (Matt.25:41). We have to feed the hungry, give water to the thirsty, show hospitality, clothe the naked, visit the sick and visit those in prison (Matt.25:34-36).

To be perfect, we have to sell everything we own, give the money to the poor and follow Jesus (Matt.19:21).

Jesus clearly said we need deeds to inherit eternal life, such as following the commandments (Matt.19:17) and so we should aim for both faith and deeds (Matt.25:46).

We can never be sure we have done enough charitable deeds in this life to warrant eternal life and so we have hope in the merciful judgement of Jesus, whom we love. Through our faith in him, we hope he will forgive the shortcomings of our deeds. ‘In his name the nations will put their hope’ (Matt.12:21).

‘And hope does not disappoint us, because God has poured out his love into our hearts by the Holy Spirit, whom he has given us’ (Rom.5:5).

Psalm 86:1-10

I often call out to God, guard my life and those of my relatives because ‘I am devoted to you’ (Ps.86:2). He will save his servants who trust in him and lift up their souls to him. He will bring us peace and joy.

When we die, we can call out to Jesus: ‘Have mercy on me, O Lord’ (Ps.86:3).

Jesus is forgiving and good, abounding in love to all who call to him (Ps.86:5).

Among the gods there is none like you, O Lord’ (Ps.86:8). An interesting phrase as it implies there are other gods with a small ‘g’. Michael Heiser (2015) lists many of the Bible references that imply there may have been a ‘heavenly council’ of created beings that helped God rule the world. This is a tempting theory as it explains much of the mythology from around the world. However, these ‘gods’ don’t seem to be around anymore – having theoretically been judged and confined – and so we shouldn’t let this concern us too much. They may all have been just imaginary. Whatever powers small ‘g’ gods may have had ‘no deeds can compare’ to those of the one true God.

Our Father is great and does marvellous things. He alone is the big ‘G’ God (Ps.86:10).

Image: Lorenzo Monaco, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Amos: The Cows of Bashan / Paul: Righteousness through Faith: 16th July 2021

Amos 3:1-4:13

God chose the Israelites, out of all the people on the earth, to be his holy people Their favoured status did not exempt them from punishment. They had betrayed him so must face righteous justice and answer for their sins (Amos 3:2). I have heard some pastors say that God does not bring hardship, that is the work of the devil. However, the devil can do nothing without the permission of God: ‘When disaster comes to a city has not the Lord caused it?’ (Amos 3:6).

Amos predicted that an enemy would overrun the land (Amos 3:11). The Assyrian exiled the Israelites in 722 BC. Just a small remnant was saved – like a piece of a sheep’s ear prised from the mouth of a lion. Amos was called to testify that God would destroy the altar at Bethel where the Israelites had worshipped their golden calf idol. Their fancy houses and mansions would be destroyed.

I rather like the expression ‘you cows of Bashan’ (Amos 4:1) referring to the women of Samaria living it up, oppressing the poor and needy and ordering their husbands to serve them in their luxurious mansions. Bashan was a prosperous fertile region with lush pastures. It reminds me of how people are desperate to go on foreign holidays at the moment to lounge by the pool and sip cocktails while coronavirus cases are surging and hospital services are starting to become strained again.

Amos criticised the Israelites’ religious practices with withering sarcasm. Amos 4:4 is like us saying: ‘Go to church and sin, go to the cathedral and sin yet more’. Their religion had become meaningless rituals about which they bragged to their neighbours. They had turned two of their most important holy sites, Bethel and Gilgal, into centres for idol worship. Bethel was where God had promised Jacob he would bless all the peoples on earth through him and his offspring (Gen.28:14). The Israelites had made a fresh start with God at Gilgal – after forty years in the wilderness – by circumcising themselves prior to the assault on Jericho (Josh.5:1-9).   

The Lord had tried many strategies to get the Israelites to return to him: from starvation to drought, pestilence, plague, war and violent insurrections, yet they still would not turn to him. They made a show of going to their heathen places of worship and bragging about their offerings but their hearts were far from God.    

I know God has snatched me from the fire on more than one occasion. I was the burning stick that was miraculously saved from a near certain fate (Amos 4:11).

The Lord God Almighty was preparing to unleash his wrath on his people and so they should prepare to meet their maker (Amos 4:12).

Romans 3:9-31

We are all the same under the skin no matter what race or religion we are (Rom.3:9).

None of us can be righteous in the sight of God by our own efforts. We are made righteous by repenting of our sins and believing in God’s son, Jesus Christ. Laws and regulations just make us aware of our shortcomings in complying with them – and our sin.

Most humans look after their own interests rather than seek God. It is only when the Holy Spirit acts on our hearts that we start to search for God.

Rom.3:12-18 is still applicable to us today. We live in a world of cursing and bitterness. Our feet are swift to shed blood. Many people live in ruin and misery. Many of us have no fear of God and have tongues that practise deceit as we speak foul, poisonous words revealing the decay of our hearts. We do not live in a peaceful world. There is endless conflict between nations over power, territory and resources.   

Some companies maintain expensive quality systems with procedures on how work should be carried out. Periodically, auditors are sent around the company to check how employees are complying with these rules and regulations. No-one ever achieves 100% in these audits. The auditors always find some nit-picking error even if they have to fabricate one to justify their jobs. Cunning employees leave a minor task undone to distract an auditor from digging deeper into more major failings. Rather than ensure the quality of the product, an over-complicated quality system just makes everyone a failure.

Many people today have mouths full of cursing and bitterness (Rom.3:14) and have no fear of God (Rom.3:18). Everyone has God’s law written on their hearts and so we have no excuse for not knowing him. We have to keep churches thriving as welcoming places of light, so that when the Holy Spirit convicts an individual of their sins, they have somewhere to go to teach them the gospel.

Christians are made righteous outside of the Jewish law. The law and the prophets testified that this would eventually happen. ‘This righteousness from God comes through faith in Jesus Christ to all who believe’. As I am using the NIV Bible translation, we miss out on the classic word ‘propitiation’, which the NIV translates as ‘a sacrifice of atonement’. MacArthur (2021) points out that ‘propitiation’ is crucial to the significance of Christ’s sacrifice with the word carrying the idea of appeasement or satisfaction ‘in this case Christ’s violent death satisfied the offended holiness and wrath of God against those for whom Christ died (Rom.3:25).

The wrath of God was satisfied’ as in the song ‘In Christ alone’.

Paul wrote that ‘all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God’ (Rom.3:23). However, Jesus didn’t sin until he became sin as he died on the cross. His mother, Mary, was sinless from the time of her conception but, as this revelation wouldn’t be officially recognised for another 1,800 years, we can let Paul off.  Jesus could not have come from a sinful egg or undergo his gestation in a sinner’s womb.

God justifies us freely and his justification is an unearned, pure gift from him (grace) through faith in the blood of Jesus that was sacrificed for our redemption (Rom. 3:24-25).

God had to sacrifice his son because of heavenly justice. When we lived in sin, we were at war with God. Someone had to pay the price for our unpunished sin and so God decided to do it himself because he loves us. Jesus paid the ‘ransom price’, the debt, that the courts of heaven had set out for our sin to be redeemed (Mark 10:45). By Jesus’ sacrificial death we were set free to be friends with God, restored back to a living relationship with our loving Father.  

Jesus was the only perfect man, the perfect sacrifice who could reverse the curse of original sin that Adam’s rebellion had blighted us with. ‘We have been made holy through the sacrifice of the holy body of Jesus Christ once for all’ (Hebrews 10:10).

We are justified by our faith in Jesus and how does faith come? Faith comes by hearing the gospel message, listening to and understanding about Jesus in the Word of God! (Rom.10:17).

Psalm 85:8-13

God’s salvation is near to us when we respect his awesome power, righteousness and might (Ps.85:9).

When we are made righteous with God through our faith in Jesus we experience God’s love and faithfulness and eternal peace (Ps.85:18).

As faithfulness springs forth from the Christians on earth, righteousness comes down to us from heaven (Ps.85:11).

When we stop rebelling and invite Jesus into our hearts as our personal saviour, the Lord will indeed give us what is good (Ps.85:12).

We may still face painful trials but they will be good for us, to train us and refine us like gold so that we can yield a precious harvest.

Once we are made righteous with God through faith, our heart is prepared for the Holy Spirit to take up residence within us (Ps.85:13).

Image: Image by Peggy und Marco Lachmann-Anke from Pixabay

Amos: Judgement on Israel and Its Neighbours / Paul on God’s Faithfulness: 15th July 2021

Amos 1:1-2:16

Today, we start the book of Amos. He was a shepherd and forester before being called to be a prophet.

Amos (meaning ‘burden-bearer’) prophesied at the time that Uzziah was king of Judah and Jeroboam II was king of the Northern kingdom (Israel) around 760 BC (Amos 1:1). He was a contemporary of Jonah. Even though Amos was born in Judah, in the South, he prophesied to the North (Israel).

The pastures of the shepherds were drying up (Amos 1:2) as were loyalty and obedience to the one true God as people prospered materially. As people’s standards of living went up during a time of peace, greed and avarice increased and people’s morals and spirituality decayed.  No wonder Amos felt compelled to speak out.

Through Amos, God pronounced judgement on Israel’s neighbours setting out the terrible things that would happen to them because of their despicable behaviour: their cruelty, slave-trading, brutality and disrespect of the dead. This included the Arameans, the Philistines, the Phoenicians in Tyre, the Edomites, the Ammonites, the Moabites and the people of Judah. The sins of Judah included rejecting the laws of God, not keeping his decrees and being led astray by false gods. For a shepherd, Amos was very well informed about world affairs through the Spirit of God.

Amos prophesied that fire would come upon Judah that would consume the fortresses of Jerusalem (Amos 2:5) and we have previously discussed how this would eventually come about. The Babylonian army would burn Jerusalem to the ground and take its inhabitants into exile (2 Kings 25:9).

Amos convicted Israel of its sins. The people were greedy; they trampled on the poor, the needy and the righteous; they denied justice to the oppressed; they were sexually immoral and they desecrated holy places with their disrespectful behaviour.

God had brought his people out of Egypt, fed them for forty years in the desert and destroyed the native people who had been living in the promised land (the Amorites who included a race of giants). The Israelites had been tremendously blessed and protected by their God. However, the Israelites had betrayed God. They had corrupted those who had taken holy vows (the Nazirites) and commanded God’s representatives (the prophets) not to speak.

God vowed to crush Israel as a heavy cart loaded with grain would crush everything in its path. Neither the swift or the strong or the brave would escape the oncoming wrath. Even the bravest warriors would flee (Amos 2:16).

My country, the (not so) United Kingdom has been struggling. The recent European football tournament revealed we still have a nasty racist element in the population, our politicians have voted to cut aid to the poorest countries in the world and some keep trying to sneak in extremist pro-abortion laws allowing terminations up to birth. Religion is marginalised and barely tolerated as long as no-one says or does anything in the name of the Lord. Spirits of disbelief and disobedience are rife, even amongst the Christian community. Was the pandemic sent to crush us until enough people cried out to the Lord? We all need to summon our inner Amos and speak out.    

Romans 2:17-3:8

Paul preached against hypocrisy. If we pronounce that people should not commit adultery, we need to be careful not to look at others with lustful eyes. If we preach against stealing, we should not cheat on our taxes or break copyright. Some Jews said they abhorred idols, but then stole the statues from pagan temples and sold them. How do we earn our living? Do we run a corner shop selling cigarettes, alcohol, lottery cards and pornoography while professing to hate the sins associated with these items. The sexual sins of ‘celibate’ priests caused massive damage to the church and resulted in God’s name being blasphemed amongst the general population (Rom.2:24). Satan will always attack and tempt priests more than any other occupation. He hates them with a vengeance. However, we all have sufficient grace to resist all temptations.

Religion cannot just be theoretical or it is worthless. If Christianity has rules and obligations we must stick with them. We can’t just be Christians outwardly, the Holy Spirit living inside us from our baptism needs to be allowed to influence our daily lives and continually make us holier. We need to be Christians in the depth of our hearts not just on the surface.

The Jews were entrusted with the very words of God (Rom.3:2). Jesus was a Jew and our salvation has come from his sacrifice on the cross. We have the New Testament in addition to the Jewish law to guide us. The word of God is our living source of inspiration.

God is faithful even when we are unfaithful. When we sin, God looks even more righteous in comparison to our sinful ways. However, we should strive to be like him through the power of the Holy Spirit. The fact that we receive salvation as a gift from God does not give us licence to sin.  We want to become more and more Christ-like each day through the power of the Holy Spirit. We are ambassadors for God.

Proverbs 17:5-14

We should never mock the poor or gloat over disaster. Christians rejoice with those who are rejoicing and weep with those in pain and suffering. They are all our brothers and sisters.

We should try to make our children proud. The immature may be embarrassed of those who live for Christ but they will show respect in the end.

We should rush to forgive and forget as ‘he who covers over an offence promotes love’ (Prov.17:9). ‘Starting a quarrel is like breaching a dam’ (Prov.17:14). It is too easy to start quarrels on social media but nobody likes to be ignored. Changing the subject may be the best way to keep our friends but we should welcome just criticism. It is precious information.

Rebellion has been rife in the country through the pandemic – many people have refused vaccines and hate wearing masks. Merciless officials will have to be sent against them to legislate for compulsory vaccines for healthcare workers and vaccination passports for holidays (Prov.17:11).

God will punish the treacherous: those who repay good with evil. He will hand them over to Satan. Evil will never leave their house until they repent and renounce their ways.

Image: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amos_(prophet)#/media/File:Amos-prophet.jpg

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