The Road to Damascus / Saul’s Conversion: June 14th 2021

2 Samuel 22:1-23:7

David sang a magnificent song of praise to the Lord after he had been delivered from all his enemies.

God is also our rock, fortress, deliverer, stronghold, refuge and Saviour (2 Sam.22:2-3). He is our shield. God rescues us from our worthless sinful lives and, through the power of the Holy Spirit, transforms us into his powerful, holy ambassadors on earth. We are made in God’s image, we are made as God’s image. Our rescue is made complete when he grants us our desire for eternal life with him.

Our Lord is worthy of praise. He will hear us when we call out in our distress, draw us out of deep waters and rescue us from powerful foes.

The Lord will deal with us according to our righteousness. Jesus has made us righteous through his death on the cross but, if we sin after our baptism, we need to be quick to confess it and ask forgiveness. ‘According to the cleanness’ of our hands will God reward us (2 Sam.22:21).

Even though David had committed adultery and murder, he had never forgotten God. He repented and renounced his sins. He was thus able to say that he was blameless before him and he had not turned away from God’s decrees (2 Sam.22:22-24).

God’s eyes are on the haughty to bring them low. He loves the humble. If we are faithful, blameless and pure, God will show us theses same attributes.

Jesus is the living light of the world (2 Sam.22:29).

God’s ways are perfect and his word is flawless. God arms us with strength for battle. He makes our feet sure so we can stand on the heights.

God delivered David from the attacks of his own people time and again and preserved him as the head of nations. God avenges us and sets us free from our enemies. He gives us great victories and shows us unfailing kindness. We are all anointed as his priests, prophets, kings and adopted children through our baptism.

We must praise and exalt God.

The Spirit of the Lord spoke through King David in beautiful psalms. Our Queen, Elizabeth II, has always had a strong faith and is like the light of morning at sunrise on a cloudless morning (2 Sam.23:4). The Spirit of God speaks through us when we pray and sing in tongues bringing strength, healing and deliverance.

David knew that God had made an everlasting covenant with him. It was arranged and secured in every part. God will bring to fruition our salvation if we are baptized and believe in Jesus’ life, death and resurrection and invite him into our lives as our personal saviour.

Acts 9:1-31

Saul, breathing out murderous threats against the Lord’s disciples, asked to go to Damascus to capture Christians and bring them back to Jerusalem.

Saul had a life-changing encounter with Jesus as he neared Damascus (Acts 9:4). Jesus asked Saul from heaven why Saul was persecuting him and by ‘him’, Jesus meant the men and women making up his living body, the newly formed church.

Saul went blind for three days and did not eat or drink anything (Acts 9:9).

The Lord called a disciple in Damascus, Ananias, to visit Saul and place his hands on him to restore his sight. Ananias was reluctant to go because he knew how much harm Saul had done to the disciples but the Lord said that he had great plans for him. Saul would carry Jesus’ name both before the Gentiles and the people of Israel (Acts 9:15).

When Ananias prayed over Saul, something like scales fell from his eyes and he could see again. Saul got up and was baptised, took some food and regained his strength (Acts 9:19). I wonder who put the scales over Saul’s eyes. Scales are significant in the Bible. The giant Goliath wore ‘scale armour’ ‘when he confronted the people of God and was defeated by David (1 Sam.17:5). Serpents have scales and so Goliath may have represented the Philistine’s deity, Dagon, or the devil himself. Saul had been inspired to persecute and murder Christians and this desire may have come from demonic oppression. Therefore, I think it may have been the devil that blinded Saul so that he would not have been able to see Jesus on the road to Damascus. The devil had given Saul both religious and physical blindness. However, Jesus’ words along were sufficient to convert this murderous zealot. Saul was healed by the faithful prayer of Ananias. The devil was foiled in the end because not only did Paul become one of the most productive apostles of all time he was also not able to see Jesus during the Damascus Christophany and so was able to write: ‘We live by faith and not by sight’ (2 Cor.5:7).

Shortly after I became a confirmed Christian, I was struck down by the devil and felt like I was dying. A local deliverance priest prayed for me and restored my health. I needed someone with strong faith and spiritual authority to banish the oppression from my body. Many new Christians need an Ananias in our lives too help strengthen and deliver us.

After several days with the disciples in Damascus, Saul preached in the synagogues that Jesus is the Son of God. Thanks to his first-class education and knowledge of the scriptures, he was able to prove to all audiences that Jesus is the Christ (Acts 9:22).

Saul was such an effective teacher that the Jews conspired to kill him. He was secretly lowered in a basket from the city walls so that he could return to Jerusalem. The disciples there were still afraid of him but he was accepted after Barnabas spoke on his behalf. It is great to have fellow Christians who know our personal journeys with the Lord and can provide references for us. Paul then spoke boldly in the name of the Lord. The Grecian Jews tired to kill him but his new Christian friends rescued him, sending him first to Caesarea and then to Tarsus. It must have been frustrating for Paul to have been sent away but he wouldn’t have lasted long if everywhere he went, people tried to kill him. He needed to spend some time refining his ministry before he would be called on to evangelise all the Gentiles.

Then the church enjoyed a time of peace and growth, strengthened and encouraged by the Holy Spirit.

Many ‘born again’ Christians can remember the exact day and location that they gave their life to Jesus. We all have our ‘Road to Damascus’ moment when we are rescued and turn to the Lord. Mine was on holiday in Rome when I cast my eyes upon Michelangelo’s painting ‘The Last Judgment’, the massive fresco that covers the entire altar wall in the Sistine Chapel. It depicts the Second Coming of Christ and the final and eternal judgment by God of all humanity. I realised that I needed to fully accept Jesus into my life in order to have hope for salvation.

Psalm 73:15-28

In Michelangelo’s magnificent painting ‘The Last Judgement‘ the damned descend to hell on the left side of Jesus (Psalm 73:18-19). Those who are far from God and unfaithful to him will perish (Psalm 73:27).

We want to be with the saved ascending to heaven on his right.

As a teenager I did what I wanted to do. I thought I wasn’t too bad relative to other people but ‘I was senseless and ignorant‘ (Psalm 73:22). I was on a gradual slippery slope to hell. However, Jesus rescued me and the Holy Spirit convicted me of my disgraceful sins and changed me for the better when I was too weak to do it myself

The Holy Spirit now permanently lives within me and will speak through me when I allow him to. He guides me with his counsel and afterwards will take me into glory. It is good to be a living tabernacle for God.

All our possessions and relationships on earth are nothing compared to our love for God. He is the strength of our hearts.

I have made God my refuge and will tell all of his deeds.

Image: By Peter Paul Rubens – Art UK, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=91917906

Amnon and Tamar / Ananias and Sapphira: June 8th 2021

2 Samuel 13:1-39

Amnon, the eldest son of King David, fell in love with one of his half-sisters: Tamar. They both had different mothers.

Amnon desired Tamar even though sexual relations between half-siblings was strictly banned under Jewish law (Lev.18:9).

Following the advice of his cunning uncle / friend, Jonadab, Amnon pretended to be sick and asked King David if Tamar could make him some food and feed it to him. David instructed her to do this. Tamar made Amnon bread but he did not eat it, he forcibly raped her. Once this had happened, Amnon’s love changed to hate and he kicked Tamar out. She put ashes on her head and tore her ornamental robe (2 Sam.13:19). She went to live with her brother Absalom as ‘a desolate woman’. King David was furious but did not discipline Amnon. Absalom said nothing but hated Amnon because of what he had done to his sister. Yesterday, we read about David’s adulterous affair that resulted in murder. Sexual sin and violence were running in the family.

King David should have ensured that justice was served. Rulers cannot afford to let serious crimes go unpunished.

Two years later, Absalom invited King David and his officials to a party. David blessed him and sent all of his sons instead. Absalom ordered his men to kill the rapist, Amnon. All of the other king’s sons fled. David received a false news report that all of his sons had been murdered by Absalom, not just Amnon. David did not take this news well (2 Sam.13:31).

Absalom fled and stayed in Geshur for three years. King David mourned for Amnon everyday but still missed Absalom (2 Sam.13:37). If David had acted justly at the time of Amnon’s crime he might not have lost two sons. Rulers cannot neglect discipline even when the guilty person is their own child.

God had disciplined David for his adulterous affair with Bathsheba. David had not disciplined his own son for a different sexual crime and was now suffering for his weak leadership.

Acts 4:23-5:11

Peter and John went back to their fellow disciples and reported how they had been treated by the chief priests and elders. The disciples raised their voices in prayer, praising God for his creation. Many people get their minds tangled up by the theory of evolution thinking that creatures made themselves over billions of years, yet the disciples stated the evident truth: ‘Sovereign Lord, you made the heaven and the earth and the sea, and everything in them’ (Acts 4:24).

It amazed the disciples as to why people try to combat God. Why do people rage / plot in vain and gather together against God? Why bother. He is all powerful, loves us and has our best interests at heart. Why not worship him and be happy? It’s because people have self-will and a rebellious, selfish streak inside them. It is still amazing that people today still worship and work for demons – an evil, totally defeated army that can only ultimately offer eternal death to their followers (Acts 4:25-26).

The disciples prayed that miraculous healing, signs and wonders would be carried out through the name of Jesus. The place where their meeting was held was shaken and they were all filled with the Holy Spirit, who enabled them to speak the word of God boldly (Acts 4:31).

‘All the believers were one in heart and mind’ (Acts 4:32). This is God’s vision for the church. That we all act in total unity, not fracture into different denominations. We should always mix with as many different congregations as we can to promote unity, friendship and peace. The disciples shared all their belongings and sold land or houses, bringing the money to the apostles so that it could be distributed for people’s needs (Acts 4:35). Modern economists preach that there is a shortage of resources in the world resulting in haves and have-nots. However, there is just a lack of fair distribution due to selfish greed. It is engrained in us to hand down property and finances to our own family, rather than share with our church family, trusting God that when we need things, they will be provided.

A couple called Ananias and Sapphira were inspired to sell their property by other believers such as Barnabas (the Son of Encouragement) to donate money to the fledgling church. However, they were only lukewarm about it. They kept back some of the money. Compared to many modern Christians – who may only give a bare minimum donation – they were extremely generous but they must have boasted and lied about giving all the money from the sale of their to the church. Peter, through a supernatural word of knowledge from the Holy Spirit, told Ananias that he had kept back some of the money. Ananias heard this, fell down and died. Later, his wife also lied to the disciples that they had given all the money from selling the land to the church and she fell down dead too. Then, ‘great fear seized the whole church’ (Acts 5:11).

If we promise our Pastor a certain sum of money or the proceeds from a certain transaction we should never be dishonest about it. God doesn’t want us to be lukewarm towards the church (Revelation 3:15-16). We should never swindle the church due to our love of money. The best way to cure ourselves from a love of money is to be generous. We should start by tithing at least ten percent of our income to the church. That is the bare minimum, after that will come gifts to charities. How else will we build a thriving community for worship and evangelisation if no-one provides adequate financial resources? We shouldn’t ask ourselves what we can get from the church, we should consider what we can give in terms of time, talent and resources.

Psalm 71:9-18

We should always have hope in God no matter how old and grey we are (Psalm 71:18).

As we look back on a long life, we will be able to proclaim God’s righteousness and the marvellous, mighty deeds he has done in our lives.

God will always come quickly to help us particularly when our enemies think we are past it and our strength is gone. He will renew our strength like that of an eagle.

God will always be our rock and our salvation. With Jesus and the Holy Spirit inside us, we are never away from his awesome presence.

Image: By Raphael – Victoria and Albert Museum, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1718099

Up ↑