Amos: The Nation to be Destroyed and then Restored / Paul: Death through Adam, Life Through Christ

Amos 8:1-9:15

God showed Amos a basket of ripe fruit that indicated that ‘the time is ripe for my people Israel; I will spare them no longer’ (Amos 8:2). The Israelites would suffer for trampling the needy, doing away with the poor and cheating people with dishonest scales. God doesn’t like greed and injustice.

God would send a new kind of famine – not of lack of food or a thirst for water – but a famine of hearing the words of the Lord (Amos 8:11). Many people in this country choose to live in a faith famine during their spiritually empty, hedonistic lifestyle. Until something terrible happens to them and they experience illness, addiction or the death of someone close to them they won’t search for the word of the Lord.

God is very angry at the Israelites and is going to ruthlessly hunt down all the sinners throughout the kingdom, no matter where they try to hide. God definitely has a hard edge and we don’t want to annoy him. When we are friends with God we find comfort that he is omnipresent and with us to the ends of the earth. Unrepentant sinners are terrified to find out they cannot escape the clutches of God. ‘I will fix my eyes upon them for evil and not for good’ (Amos 9:4). The relationship between God and evil is a difficult topic. Some pastors gloss over this with a childish ‘God is good’ and ‘devil is bad’ simplicity. However, the devil is not allowed to do anything unless God has permitted him to do so. God is in charge of everything that takes place. The devil is constrained in his actions (or we would all be dead already) and so if something bad is happening in your life, it is because God has loosened the restraints on the devil to allow it to take place. Allowing something to take place or neglecting to stop it when you have the power (and God has all the power) is the same as doing it yourself. So we can safely conclude that God allows both good and evil events, even though he wants us all to live in love and peace. When God allows evil to happen it is because he wants a greater good to come out of it.

We can see the horrors of the holocaust in Amos 9:2-4 with the Jews driven into exile and slayed by the sword. Wherever they hid, the Jewish people were hunted down and slayed. It is a terrifying prophecy.

God was going to shake Israel as grain is shaken in a sieve to remove the rubbish. All the complacent sinners would be sifted out to die by the sword.  

Eventually, God would restore Israel and bring his exiled people back – as he demonstrated in 1948. The Israelis rebuilt cities, planted vineyards and ate their own fruit (Amos 9:14).

Shepherds play a key role in the history of Israel. Amos, a shepherd turned prophet, predicted exile followed by restoration. Jeremiah prophesied that the bad shepherds of the Israelites would be punished and that God himself would gather the remnant of his flock from exile. God would place good shepherds over them to tend them until the ultimate good shepherd, Jesus, would be born (Jer.23:5). As soon as baby Jesus had been born, the shepherds in the fields near Bethlehem were called by the angels to pay homage to the king of all shepherds.  

No matter how hostile their neighbours are, aggression against Israel will always be pointless as God has replanted his holy people in their own land, that he had given them ‘never again to be uprooted’ (Amos 9:15).

Romans 5:12-21

Sin entered the world through one man, Adam and we all retain part of his damaged nature, a tendency to choose sin. Death came through sin and reigned from the time of Adam to the time of Moses, when the law was given. We were all condemned by the single sin of Adam but we have been redeemed by Jesus, the new Adam.

God’s gift of grace came after millions of sins and brought justification (Romans 5:16). Death was able to spread through the whole human race by Adam’s sin, but Jesus’ death gives us abundant life through God’s endless provision of grace and gift of righteousness. We are no longer guilty and condemned in God’s sight once we are baptized and believe in Jesus. Through God’s priceless gift of grace, he has made us his adopted children, co-heirs with his son and he remains pleased with us.

The people of the world are no longer condemned to death as we were due to Adam’s sin. Our justification by the blood of Jesus has brought eternal life to all people through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.  

Proverbs 17:15-24

God detests injustice (Prov.17:15). We should never accept bribes to pervert the course of justice (Prov.17:23).

We won’t prosper if we have perverse hearts and deceitful tongues (Prov.17:20). After becoming baptized, we need to ask the Holy Spirit living within us to sanctify us, to day-by-day gradually drive the perversity out of our hearts.

True friends are exceedingly precious and may be more help in adversity than many members of our family. True friends can be rare and often we can only count our married partner as a true friend.  Men often have acquaintances rather than ‘friends’. They share a hobby or pastime together and this might just be football or drinking. It is very rare to have a friendship like David had with Saul’s son, Jonathan. They were friends that loved at all times (Prov.17:17). David was a man after God’s own heart and so would have avoided picking quarrels with his friend (Prov.17:19).    

Foolish people do not bring joy to their parents and they waste money. They have no desire to get wisdom. We should pray the Holy Spirit each day to receive wisdom and to esteem it more than gold. ‘A discerning man keeps wisdom in view’ (Prov.17:24).

Being cheerful makes us healthy. If our spirit is crushed, an evil spirit of trauma can latch onto us and prolong our grief. Evil spirits want us to destroy ourselves and those around us. We need to attend a Spirit-filled church to praise and worship God and to receive prayer for inner healing.

Amos: Woe to the complacent / Paul: Peace and Joy: July 18th 2021

Amos 6:1-7:17

Woe to those who are complacent! (Amos 6:1). Many people feel complacent and secure these days and see no point in worshipping the One True God, creator of heaven and earth. They lounge on couches, enjoy their barbeques, hum along to secular music, use the finest lotions and drink like fish but do not grieve over the state of our country or God’s people; how we kill over 200,000 of our unborn children each year and churches close due to selfish disinterest. They will be among ‘the first to go into exile’ (Amos 6:7). Their feasting and lounging will end at the day of judgement.

God hates false pride. People think they have achieved success in their lives without any help from God. They brag and network with other narcissists about their careers on social media. People live in big houses and think they are secure yet we live behind panes of glass through which anyone armed with the smallest rock could enter. Pride comes before a dramatic fall. We need to praise and thank God every day for our blessings.

We are like wonky walls badly constructed by cowboy builders. I was built on a strong sold foundation having been baptised at the age of one. However, my family were not strong believers and, as I grew, I went askew. When I assessed the constructed wall of my life, it contained twisted and warped bricks that had thrown my life off-plumb. I see teenagers now at church who have thrived under strong Christian parents who are beautifully constructed beacons of light.

The Lord showed Amos that Israel had not been built to his plumbline. The country was warped, twisted and shoddy in its faith and morals. God would destroy its pagan worship sites and send armed raiders to plunder its cities and exile its people.

Amaziah, the priest of the idol-worship shrine at Bethel, complained to King Jeroboam II about Amos. Amaziah told Amos to go back to Judah. Amos explained that it hadn’t been his idea to be a prophet. God had taken him from herding sheep and looking after sycamores and told him to prophesy to Israel (Amos 7:15) that it would go into exile.

Amos had an even worse personal prophecy for the corrupt priest (Amos 17:17).

Amaziah recognised Amos as a ‘seer’ (Amos 17:12) but did not want to listen to his truthful bad news. Many people today try to blot out hearing the gospel and avoid priests as they know they would convict their self-centred lifestyle. However, God’s soldiers will not go away as we have been commanded to share the word of God. We need to all stop hiding from the truth and listen. Then God can work within us and heal us. God can change his mind about destroying our country and our people if we repent and turn to him. He is always calling us home to him.

Romans 4:16-5:11

In the sight of God, Abraham is the father of us all. Abraham has been made the father of many nations. Abraham believed through faith that he could still be a father even though ‘his body was as good as dead’ (Rom.4:19).

God credits us with righteousness – as he did for Abraham – when ‘we believe in him who raised Jesus our Lord from the dead’ (Rom.4:24). Jesus was ‘delivered over to death’ as a ransom payment for our sins and was ‘raised to life for our justification’ so we become innocent in God’s eyes as if we were a freshly baptized child (Rom.4:25). We become clothed in a spotless white robe as if we had never sinned.

Having been justified by God’s grace through faith, we are now at peace with God (Rom.5:1). We were previously at war, but peace has come through our Lord Jesus Christ.

As Christians we should rejoice in our sufferings because out of them we gain perseverance, character and hope. God has given us the Holy Spirit, who has poured God’s love into our hearts.

While we were still sinners, Christ died for us’ (Rom.5:8). He saw the potential in us if love were to be poured into our hearts and we were made right with God.

We were reconciled to God through Jesus’ death. But Jesus came back to life. He walks with us, encourages us, intercedes for us and along with the Father sends us the Holy Spirit, who sanctifies us. As we are now God’s adopted children, we can rejoice in God. Jesus bore all of God’s wrath on the cross for us and there is now no wrath left for believers (MacArthur, 2021, 1551).

Psalm 86:11-17

If we have a divided heart, we should pray to God to make it whole, so that we will be in awe of the Lord. Then we can praise God with all our heart (Ps.86:12).

The Holy Spirit teaches us the way of God, so that we can walk in the truth (Ps.86:11).  

Jesus died on the cross in order to deliver us from the depths of the grave (Ps.86:13). After he died, he descended into hell and rescued Adam and Eve out of his great love for them. He was their creator and their redeemer, yet was also one of their descendants.

God sent his son to die for us because He is slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness (Ps.86:15). He turned to us and had mercy on us.

When I have been laid low and attacked by oppressive thoughts or insolent people, God has always shown me the way out. He has placed people in the right place to help me and curated magazine and newspaper articles to guide me. He continues to be my helper and my comforter (Ps.86:17).

Image: Image by Pete Linforth from Pixabay

Multiple kings of Israel and Judah / Paul before Agrippa: July 7th 2021

2 Kings 14:23-15:38

Jeroboam II became king of Israel and he was just as evil as the first Jeroboam (2 Kings 14:24).

However, God had promised not to blot out Israel from under heaven. He saw how bitterly everyone in Israel was suffering and that there was no-one but Him to help. He supported Jeroboam II to restore the boundaries of the country (2 Kings 14:26-27). Jesus, the son of God, died for us all while we were still sinners. God loves us no matter how enmeshed in sin we are.

Azariah, son of Amaziah, became king of Judah and ‘did what was right in the eye of the Lord’ (2 Kings 15:3). However, he was afflicted by leprosy until the day he died and lived in a separate house. Jotham, his son, was in charge of the palace. Jotham governed the people and succeeded him.

Zechariah succeeded Jeroboam II as king of Israel. He carried on with Israel’s evil ways. He was publicly assassinated by Shallum, who then succeeded him as king. Shallum only lasted one month before being assassinated by Menahem, who also brutally attacked the city of Tiphsah.

Menahem was yet another evil king of Israel. The country was invaded by the Assyrians and Menahem gave Pul, King of Assyria, one thousand talents of silver that Menahem had extracted as a tax from wealthy Israelites. The Assyrians then withdrew from Israel.

Pekaniah, Menahem’s son, followed the standard template: he ruled briefly in an evil manner and was assassinated.

Pekah, Pekaniah’s assassin, reigned for twenty years. He did evil in the eyes of the Lord. During Pekah’s reign, the new king of Assyria, Tiglath-Pileser, invaded a large area of Israel and deported the inhabitants to Assyria. Pekah was then assassinated by Hoshea.

Meanwhile in Judah, Jotham son of Uzziah began a sixteen-year reign. He followed the Lord (apart from not removing the high places). He rebuilt the Upper Gate of the Temple of the Lord. God started to send both the king of Aram and Pekah, the king of Israel, against Judah.

These kings showed a distinct pattern of behaviour. Israel’s kings were consistently evil in the tradition of Jeroboam I. However, God refused to let his chosen country be overthrown completely even though he allowed the Assyrian empire to harass them. The Israelites at first paid the Assyrians a fortune to leave them alone but eventually they lost territory and people to them.

The kings of Judah followed the Lord – but never manage to eliminate worship at the high places, allowing evil idolatry to cling on in their country. God did not give Judah rest and allowed neighbouring countries to harass them. Neither Judah or Israel were enjoying a settled or peaceful time.

Acts 25:23-26:23

King Agrippa and his sister, Bernice, along with other leaders came to hear Paul’s testimony. Festus admitted that Paul had done nothing deserving of death. Festus would send him to Rome for a trial but didn’t know what charges he should document in an accompanying letter to the emperor.

Paul started his defence by praising King Agrippa (Acts 26:2-3). Paul explained that he was a Pharisee and that the only reason he was on trial was that he had ‘hope in what God has promised our fathers’ (Acts 26:6).

Paul admitted that he used to persecute Christians, imprisoning them and voting for them to die. He had tried to force them to blaspheme and was so obsessed with persecuting them, that he had even travelled to foreign cities to capture them.  

He told the audience about his road to Damascus encounter with Jesus. Paul had been ‘kicking against the goads’ i.e. making his life much harder than it needed to be when he had fought Jesus (Acts 26:14). He shouldn’t resist Christianity; he should become a Christian and go with the changing tide.  

Paul was appointed as a ‘servant and as a witness’ (Acts 26:16) and sent to the Gentiles to open their eyes. He preached and wrote his inspired letters to turn us from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God. Jesus’ death allows us to receive forgiveness for our sins and a place among those sanctified by faith in him (Acts 26:18).

Paul preached that we should repent, turn to God and ‘prove our repentance by our deeds’ (Acts 26:20).

Paul confidently stated that he was saying nothing beyond what Moses and the prophets had predicted. Christ would suffer, be the first to rise from the dead and proclaim light to both the Jews and the Gentiles (Acts 26:23).

This was an amazing speech because it came from the Holy Spirit. Paul delivered it as the mouthpiece of God. We should never worry about what to say when we are brought before governors and kings. The Spirit of our Father will speak through us (Matt.10:19-20).

Proverbs 16:18-27

Today, we have the timeless advice that pride comes before a fall (Prov.16:18).

It is a blessing to mix with the oppressed. It would be an empty life just sharing plunder with the proud.

We will prosper if we are humble enough to heed instruction and gain priceless understanding.

We should pray to the Holy Spirit for the gifts of wisdom and discernment.

Pleasant words promote teaching and are ‘sweet to the soul and healing to the bones’ (Prov.16:24).

The speech from an evil scoundrel is like scorching fire. If we follow what seems right to man, rather than to God, it will lead us to death.

I am blessed because I trust in the Lord (Prov.16:20).

Absalom’s death / Stephen’s Speech to the Sanhedrin: June 11th 2021

2 Samuel 16:15-18:18

David had sent his friend, Hushai, to give poor advice to Absalom (David’s treacherous son who was intent on taking over the country). Absalom suspected Hushai’s motives as he knew he was a good friend of David’s (2 Sam.16:17).

Absalom first of all asked the renowned wise man Ahithophel how to progress his coup. Ahithophel told him to publicly lie with all of David’s ten concubines. This would declare to the whole of Israel that he had formerly set himself against his father. Absalom did this because Ahithophel had a great reputation for giving wise advice (2 Sam.16:23).

Ahithophel then wisely recommended that Absalom should assassinate his father David and bring all the other Israelites back to him. Absalom would have gained the throne if he had done this but God had made him resistant to good advice.

This gave Hushai the chance to propose an alternative strategy. Hushai recommended gathering an enormous army and killing not only David but also all his supporters. He managed to get Absalom to sign up to this plan (2 Sam.17:14). Hushai then sent David a secret message telling him to cross the river Jordan to get away from Absalom’s army.

Aphithophel was so upset that his wise advice had been ignored that he went and hanged himself (2 Sam.17:23). It would have been better for him to stay loyal to King David and to have left Jerusalem with him.

David had travelled to Mahanaim and was treated hospitably by people in the region. They brought him and his army bedding and food.

David mustered his men for battle and wanted to fight with them but they would not allow it. He was too valuable. He stood at the gate of the city in support but begged his soldiers to be gentle with his disloyal son (2 Sam.18:5). It is incredible that David should still want to protect someone who had disrespected his reign and was leading a massive army to kill him.

In the ensuing battle, David’s army killed twenty thousand Israelite soldiers. They probably had far more motivation in that they were fighting for their lives whereas the Israelites were just trying to swap one satisfactory king with another. There is the intriguing statement: ‘the forest claimed more lives that day than the sword’ (2 Sam.18:8), which implies that God was fighting for David in unusual ways. Perhaps the enemy troops ran into the forest in panic and fell into concealed ravines / large pits. They might have been attacked by wild animals or God may even have mobilised the trees to entangle the troops and drop branches on them. I suspect this verse was the inspiration for Tolkien’s Fangorn forest in ‘The Lord of the Rings’.

Absalom himself fell victim to one of the trees in the forest. His head got caught in the branches of a large oak as he was trying to ride under it and he was left swinging there. One of David’s soldiers saw his predicament but did nothing because of David’s command to be gentle with him. Joab, David’s army commander, thought this was nonsense and he and his men went and executed Absalom as if he were a piñata. Joab buried him in a large pit in the forest.

Absalom had earlier vainly set up a stone pillar as a monument to himself in the King’s Valley (see photo). It is difficult what to make of Absalom’s life. He had stood up for justice by avenging the rape of his sister Tamar but he had been extremely disrespectful and disloyal to his father, King David – possibly out of frustration that David hadn’t disciplined his rapist son, Amnon. David had welcomed Absalom back from exile and still wanted to protect him even after he had slept with his women and assembled a massive army to hunt him down. Absalom was a victim of his own good looks, charisma and vanity, lusting for power and thinking that he could do better than his father, who was loved by God. Absalom would have done better to emulate David’s patience, tolerance, love and humility.

Acts 7:20-43

Stephen continued to give the seventy one members of the Sanhedrin a potted history of the Jewish nation. At first glance, this would appear to be like me narrating the Nativity story to the Pope. I am sure they intimately knew the Old Testament storylines already but they had missed the vital point. All the Jewish Old Testament scriptures pointed to Jesus. Even today, many Jews aren’t taught the whole of Isaiah as it so obviously prophesies all about the life of Jesus (Isaiah 53:4-5).

However, Stephen would skilfully be building his later statements on the firm foundations of the Old Testament. Our faith in Jesus Christ is rooted upon the prophesies of the Old Testament. Jesus is referred to throughout the Old Testament and he often personally appeared and interacted with key characters, this is known as a Christophany,

Stephen reminded the Jewish elders that Moses had told the Israelites: ‘God will send you a prophet like me from your own people’ (Acts 7:37). This ‘prophet’ was Jesus, whom they had just killed. In fact, the Jews had killed virtually all of God’s messengers that had been sent to them. Jesus’ life had multiple similarities to that of Moses but Jesus was far greater. Moses delivered his people from oppression and slavery and led them to freedom. Jesus rescued the whole world from the oppression of the devil and the slavery of sin and death.

Stephen repeatedly demonstrated that God throughout history did not just dwell in the Jewish temple. God met people wherever they travelled from the burning bush in the desert, in Gentile territory, to the wonders he performed in Egypt. The Jewish religious elite did not accept that God had become incarnate in the form of Jesus and had performed miracles outside the temple. Many Christians these days tick off their religious obligations by monotonously attending a fixed-format service in a certain church each Sunday as if Jesus is confined to the four walls of that building. However, we carry God inside each one of us. He is fully portable. He is God of the whole world, there is nowhere we can hide from him, and we should be taking him with us each day to meet the needs of suffering people throughout the secular world.

Stephen would became the first Christian martyr and his evangelistic speech is a powerful example for all of us to follow. Stephen’s name mean ‘victor’s crown’ and, even though he was stoned to death, he delivered a timeless ‘victory speech’.

This event would be the official Jewish rejection of the renewed offer of the kingdom, paving the way for salvation to be eventually offered to all the Gentiles.

It would have intimidated an average person to give witness in front of 71 members of the Sanhedrin but Stephen was empowered by the Holy Spirit. He was meant to be defending himself but he went on the attack and prosecuted the Jewish elders. Stephen was innocent, yet he would be punished. The Sanhedrin were guilty yet would escape punishment until God meted out his eternal justice.

Religious leaders have a history of rejecting God’s truth and his messengers. The Israelites had rejected God in the desert and so God turned away from them (Acts 7:42). The Jewish leaders were now rejecting God again with their beloved temple now becoming a worthless idol following the death of Christ.

Psalm 71:1-20

We should pray for our rulers to be people of justice and righteousness.

Queen Elizabeth II has had a spectacularly long reign because we all pray for her when we sing the National Anthem: ‘God save our gracious Queen. Long live our noble Queen’. Prayers really do work.

Our politicians should deliver the needy who cry out and the afflicted who have no-one to help, particularly our most vulnerable citizens, unborn children (Psalm 72:12). They should take pity on the weak and the needy, to save them from death.

We lose over 200,000 unborn children a year in the UK because we no not rescue them from oppression and violence. Their blood is precious in God’s sights (Psalm 72:14).

God alone does marvellous needs and we should praise his glorious name for ever.

Jesus created the world and he will be with us until the end of time. He will endure for ever and his words will feed us and water us so that we flourish (Psalm 72:5-7).

Image: Absalom’s monument: Alien is, CC BY-SA 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

David fights the Arameans / Peter and John Heal a Man Crippled from Birth: June 6th 2021

2 Samuel 9:1-10:19

David tracked down his deceased friend Jonathan’s disabled son. David was determined to show kindness to someone from the house of Saul for Jonathan’s sake.

Jonathan’s son was called Mephibosheth and David restored to him the land of his grandfather, Saul, and allowed him to always eat at his table.

It is wonderful to spend time considering if there is someone we can help out / be kind to and get on and do it.

The king of the Ammonites died and David sent a delegation to express his sympathy to his son. The Ammonite nobles accused the visiting Israelites of being spies and assaulted them disrespectfully (2 Sam.10:4). The Ammonites realised this had angered David and they hired mercenaries to bolster their army. David sent Joab and his entire army of fighting men against them.

The hired men, Arameans, fled in front of the Israelite army. They eventually regrouped and engaged Israel in battle. David’s army killed a huge number of them (2 Sam.10:18) including the commander of their army. This made smaller nations make peace with the Israelites out of respect for them and the Arameans were too afraid to help the Ammonites any more.

Acts 3:1-26

A man crippled from birth asked Peter and John for money. He didn’t even look at them. He didn’t realise that they, out of all the people passing him by, were now adopted sons of God with the power to heal him. Peter commanded the man to look at them (Acts 3:4). The man finally gave them his attention, expecting to get something from them.

Peter said he didn’t have any money ‘but what I have I give you. In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, walk’ (Acts 3:6-7). Peter helped the man up and instantly his feet and ankles became strong. The man had never walked for his whole life but was now able to walk, jump and praise God. It was an outstanding miracle and shows that we, as baptized spirit-filled disciples, can also pray powerfully for healing ‘in the name of Jesus’. A crown of onlookers acknowledged the man’s healing and were filled with wonder and amazement.

The place where the healing took place was a temple gate called ‘Beautiful’. Peter and John had seen the beauty in a man created by God, even though he needed healing. The crowd saw the beauty of Jesus’ healing power changing someone’s life for ever. We can encounter someone that needs healing wherever we may travel. The Holy Spirit might whisper to us that we should walk up a different street than usual or go somewhere at a certain time in order to meet someone we can help. Let us boldly seize the chance and not walk on by. A friend of mine specialised in healing strangers in supermarkets. He marched up to a lady one day in the vegetable aisle and said: ‘I can see you have a problem with your leg. I am a Christian, may I pray for you.’ Most people are very grateful for the offer. Everyone likes attention. The lady replied: ‘I didn’t know that I had any problem with my leg but please go ahead anyway’.

Peter asked the crowd why this miracle surprised them. It was not the disciples’ own power or godliness that had healed the man but the authority of Jesus’ name and the faith that comes through him (Acts 3:16). Peter reminded the crowd that they had disowned the Holy and Righteous One and killed the author of life (Acts 3: 14-15). So many people in our society today still disown Jesus and allow a murderer, the devil, free access to take up residence within them. The crowd in Jerusalem had acted out of ignorance but modern people are far more guilty. Most are not ignorant of the gospel, they just ignore it and refuse to believe in active rebellion against God.

Peter urged the crowd to repent and turn to God so that their sins would be wiped out (Acts 3:19). When we finally turn to God and become ‘born again’ our whole body and spirit will be refreshed.

Jesus will physically remain in heaven until the time comes for God to restore everything (Acts 3:21) but he spiritually lives in the hearts of all born-again Christians.

Moses had prophesied that Jesus would be raised up from the Jews. All the prophets, from Samuel on, had foretold the appearance of Christ (Acts 3:24). Jesus wants to turn all of us from our wicked ways through the power and encouragement of the Holy Spirit.

Jesus is descended from the original patriarch, Abraham, because God had promised him: ‘Through your offspring all peoples on earth will be blessed’ (Acts 3:25).

Psalm 70:1-5

We can pray for God to hasten to save us. He is our help and our deliverer (Ps.70:5).

Jesus taught us to pray for our enemies (Romans 12:14) in contrast to King David who often wanted his enemies to be shamed / confused and disgraced. However, God will make sure that justice is delivered (Romans 12:19-21).

King David prayed that all who seek God will rejoice and be glad in him.

I love the kind salvation that God has given me and so I proclaim, with David, ‘Let God be exalted!’ (Ps.70:4).

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_apostles_Peter_and_John_heal_the_lame_man._Photomechanic_Wellcome_V0034960.jpg

God makes a Promise to David / Save Yourself from this Corrupt Generation: June 5th 2021

2 Samuel 7:1-8:18

David often reflected on his life and circumstances. He was now settled in his palace and he had been given rest from his enemies but he still couldn’t relax about the ark of the Covenant (2 Sam.7:2).

God spoke to Nathan the prophet. God had taken David from shepherding a flock of sheep to be ruler over his people, Israel. God promised to make David’s name great (2 Sam.7:9). The nation of Israel would have a home of their own and no longer be disturbed. The Lord said that David’s offspring would be the one to build a house for the ark of the Covenant (2 Sam.7:13). David’s house, kingdom and throne would be established for ever, eventually via Jesus (2 Sam.7:16).

David prayed to God and marvelled at how well God treated him: ‘Is this your usual way of dealing with man, O Sovereign Lord? (2 Sam.7:19). There is no God like him and, at the time, no chosen people like Israel (2 Sam.7:23-24). David knew that God was trustworthy and had promised him good things (2 Sam.7:29).

David called himself God’s servant, yet was promised wonderful things for both him and his descendants. As baptized Christians, we are no longer servants; we are God’s adopted children, co-heirs with Christ. How much more will he give his children if we are people, like David, after his own heart.

David’s prayer is a great model for us to follow. He praised God for his greatness and for the awesome wonders he had performed to rescue the Israelites from Egypt. He reminded him that he had become the God of Israel. He asked God to keep his promises so that his name would be great (hallowed) for ever and, only then, dared to ask God to bless him and his family. Then, he proclaimed faithfully that his prayer had been instantly answered.

This shows that we shouldn’t just start our prayers with saying what we want. There should be praise, a reminder of God’s wonders and a reminder of his promises in scripture first.

David enjoyed great success in battle defeating the Philistines, the Arameans, the Edomites and the Moabites. He brutally reduced the numbers of Moabites by two-thirds and the survivors became subject to him. He collected plunder from his wars: chariots, silver, bronze and gold shields. King David dedicated these articles to the Lord (2 Sam. 8:11). The Lord gave David victory wherever he went and he ruled his people justly. It was a great start to his reign. If only he had kept on like this without soon succumbing to serious sin.

Acts 2:22-47

Peter continued to dynamically preach to the crowd now that he had been fired up by the Holy Spirit. Peter explained that God had confirmed Jesus was his son through miracles, wonders and signs.

It was God’s plan that Jesus should be handed over and nailed to the cross. God raised him from the dead ‘because it was impossible for death to keep its hold on him’ (Acts 2:23-24). Jesus is always with us and so we should not be shaken. Even when we mourn with those who mourn and weep with those who weep, our hearts are always glad and our tongues are always ready to rejoice because he will not abandon us to the grave (Acts 2:26-27).

King David was a prophet and knew that God would place one of his descendants, Jesus, on the throne forever. David had prophesied that Jesus would not be allowed to see decay. Jesus makes known to us the paths of life and fills us with joy in his presence (Acts 2:28).

Peter told the assembled crowd that the apostles were witnesses to the fact that God raised Jesus from the dead. They were honest people and they had nothing to gain from misleading people. They would suffer horrible deaths holding to the truth of Jesus’ death and resurrection. We should never reject their eye-witness accounts due to our own pride, stubbornness or being misled by the evil spirit of unbelief, that is so prevalent in the world right now.

All Israel needs to be assured that God had made Jesus, who they had crucified, both Lord and Christ (Acts 2:36).

The people were ‘cut to the heart‘ when they realised their crime and asked what they should do. Jesus died because of our past, present and future sins. Our own personal sins carried out today made it necessary for Jesus to die.

Peter told them the remedy for their guilt. They should ‘repent and be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of sins’. At our baptism, we receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. Peter was adamant that this would happen not only to the crowd who were present, but also to their children and all those who God would call in the future (Acts 2:38-39).

Adults who repent and are baptized today save themselves from this current corrupt generation through choosing to accept God’s priceless and timeless gifts.

Three thousand new believers were added that day and they lived in unselfish fellowship, with glad and sincere hearts, sharing everything in common and giving to anyone who had need. Many wonders and miraculous signs were done by the apostles. There was an atmosphere of awe and praise. They devoted themselves to learning more about God, breaking bread with each other and praying. The believers had glad and sincere hearts. Their new lifestyle was a remarkable contrast to those around them and its joy and exuberance attracted new people each day.

The new believers enjoyed the favour of all people, which is very different to how the church is generally perceived these days. Jewish law and society had given people a baseline of morality and Christianity enhanced this. These days, many people aren’t brought up under a religious code and so they build their lives with no moral foundation. People pick and chose their own morality and modern Christianity with eternal values clashes with a ‘I can do whatever I like as long as it doesn’t hurt someone’ attitude. However, no sin is ever private. God sees whatever we do, wherever we do it. Society rises and falls together based on everyone’s collective actions.

The early church seems idyllic but would soon face persecution. Persecution scattered the new Christian church but God brings good out of every crisis. Scattering led to the growth of the church and the gospel being spread to all known nations.

Proverbs 14:5-14

We should always be truthful witnesses (Prov.14:5). The apostles were truthful witnesses to the death and resurrection of Jesus while their persecutors poured out lies.

Mocking people don’t recognise wisdom even when it is right in front of them. When discerning people reflect on the word of God, knowledge comes easily.

I know rebellious people who have decided in their hearts that there is no God. Yet, I sometimes read their posts on Facebook. The Bible says that I should not bother (Prov.14:7).

As prudent people, we should honestly appraise our lives and the decisions we make and quickly apologise to God for the sins we have committed, making amends to anyone we have hurt. We should have goodwill towards all people. Foolish people deceive themselves that they don’t need to say sorry to a higher power and that they are ‘good people’ relative to some others.

Rebellious people are swayed by today’s society to do things that are lawful but contrary to the intentions of God (Prov.14:12).

When we die, we will be rewarded by God for the good we have done in this life. He will reveal to us what his plans were for us (he prepared good works in advance for us to do) and how much we achieved in relation to them. This could be a very sobering conversation and most of us will rely on the blood of Christ to cover our enormous shortfalls (Prov.14:14).

If we live an upright life, we will flourish both in this life and in our life everlasting (Prov.14:11).

Image: Saint Peter at Pentecost. Public Domain.

David anointed King / Judas must be Replaced: June 3rd 2021

2 Samuel 3:22-5:5

Joab, one of David’s commanders, murdered Abner who David had told to go in peace. Joab killed Abner in revenge for the killing of one of his brothers in an earlier battle.

David declared himself innocent of Abner’s death and he cursed the house of Joab (2 Sam.3:28-29). David wept aloud and fasted at Abner’s funeral to demonstrate to his people that he had no part in the murder. Everything that David did pleased the people.

Even though David was the anointed king, he considered himself weak. He felt his kingship was in a precarious position and called on the Lord to repay evildoers for their deeds (2 Sam. 3:39).

Saul’s son, Ish-Bosheth, was murdered on his bed by his own men. They took his severed head to David expecting a reward but David was furious and had the traitors killed.

All the tribes of Israel came to David. They knew that David had been the one to successfully lead their military commands while Saul was king. They knew that the Lord approved of him. David was anointed king over all Israel and he reigned for forty years. David was called on by God to ‘shepherd my people Israel’ (2 Sam. 5:2). His descendant, Jesus, was destined to be the good shepherd for all the world.

Acts 1:1-22

Saint Luke wrote ‘Acts’ as well as the Gospel that bears his name. He wrote more of the New Testament than any other single writer including Saint Paul. Luke was a Gentile not a Jew, a Syrian from Antioch. He was a well educated man – a doctor – and when writing his accounts of Jesus and the apostles seems to have had privileged access to Mary, Mother of Jesus, and her friends.

Luke states that after Jesus’ resurrection he gave many convincing proofs that he was alive over a period of forty days (Acts 1:3). Jesus had told the apostles not to leave Jerusalem until they had been baptised with the Holy Spirit (Acts 1:5). The gifts of power from the Holy Spirit are for all that have been called to be Christians. The Holy Spirit will sanctify us and work on changing us from within into Jesus. The more we hand over to him through praying in the Spirit, the more he will be able to mould and shape us so that we reflect Jesus to all we meet.

Jesus had told the apostles to be his witnesses to the ends of the earth (Acts 1:8). Jesus ascended into heaven but will one day come back (Acts 1:11).

According to Acts, Judas, the betrayer of Jesus, had bought a field with the reward for his wickedness. However, in Matthew, Judas returned the money and hanged himself (Matt. 27:5). The Chief Priests then bought a field with the returned ‘blood money’ for burying foreigners. Luke wrote that Judas fell over in his new field with fatal consequences (Acts 1:18-19) and that is why it was called the ‘Field of Blood’. Either way, no-one lived in this field, as David had prophesied in Psalm 69:25.

Peter had already taken on the leadership of the fledgling church (one hundred and twenty believers) and announced that they must choose one person from the wider group of disciples, who had accompanied Jesus his whole ministry, and appoint them as an apostle to replace Judas. Peter was keen to maintain twelve apostles as there were twelve tribes of Israel.

Jesus’ death and resurrection are the corner-stone of the Christian faith and must be defended at all times. Some people acknowledge Jesus as a wise teacher but think he sneaked off into obscurity and died a natural death. What would be the point of that? The whole reason Jesus appeared on earth was to defeat the works of the devil, wiping out sin and taking the sting out of death, opening up the way to eternal life for all those who are baptized and believe. Jesus had to die to make us righteous and justified with God through his precious blood being spilled for us all. If he didn’t die, we would still be in a state of eternal sin and not able to enter God’s presence. Only Jesus, the one mediator between humans and God, was able to make us right with the Father. We cannot earn a place in heaven through our good deeds and impeccable behaviour. When men and women refuse the gospel, it is because they have become hardened as a result of sin and their trust in their own works. The only way to the Father is through the death and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Psalm 69:13-28

God will rescue us with his sure salvation when we cry out to him. He will deliver us from those who hate us.

As Jesus was on the cross, the floodwaters of our sins engulfed him. He was in terrible trouble as he became sin and God, the Father, temporarily turned his back on him. As Jesus died, the depths did swallow him up and the pit closed its mouth over him (Psalm 69:15). However, the same Holy Spirit, who is within every baptized Christian, raised and resurrected Jesus from hell. With his great mercy, the Spirit turned to him, rescued him and redeemed him. Jesus redeemed us from sin by the sacrifice of his perfect, holy blood.

The scorn of our friends and families for the gospel message we love can threaten to break our hearts (Psalm 69:19-20). We have to turn to our fellow believers to find comfort and sympathy. Jesus literally died from a broken heart as he was crucified due to the physiological changes in his body. He was disgraced and shamed in death but glorified by his triumphant resurrection.

While Jesus was dying on the cross, the prophecy in Psalm 69:21 was fulfilled. He was given vinegar for his thirst.

Jesus sets a banquet out before us. We just have to believe in him and be baptized to be given eternal life. The banquet table set before us is a trap for non-believers; when they die and are judged, they will have to explain how they consistently failed to believe despite the truthful witness of the disciples and billions of other Christians around the world. Their eyes are darkened so they cannot see but only because they chose not to believe, trusting proudly in their own intellect, which will only lead them to death.

We need to praise God that we are listed with the righteous and not blotted out from the book of life.

Image of Saint Mattias: By Workshop of Simone Martini – Public domain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Matthias#/media/File:Saint_Matthias.PNG

Miraculous Catch of Fish / Jesus Reinstates Peter: June 2nd 2021

2 Samuel 2:8-3:21

There was now a civil war between the Israelites who supported the son of Saul, Isah-Bosheth, and David’s men.

Ish-Bosheth ruled Israel and David ruled Judah (2 Sam.3:1).

Abner, the commander of Saul’s army, was insulted by Saul’s son and decided to switch allegiance to David. David demanded that his first wife Michal, the daughter of Saul, should be returned to him. Abner agreed and went on a diplomatic mission to the different tribes of Israel encouraging them to accept David as king in order to unite the nation (2 Sam. 3:18).

John 21:1-25

Jesus appeared again to the disciples. This time, by the sea of Tiberias. The disciples had been fishing all night and had caught nothing. Jesus called out to them from the shore (John 21:6).

Simon Peter was so excited to see Jesus that he jumped off the boat into the water to meet him.

Jesus invited the disciples to breakfast. He was already cooking fish on a fire of burning coals. The disciples had caught 153 large fish in their net by following Jesus’ instructions. There isn’t a universal agreement as to whether this specific number has a deeper significance. I think this story shows that the apostles weren’t going to make any progress spreading the gospel by themselves. They had to continue to work closely with Jesus. He knows who has been given to him by the Father; he knows where they are and how to catch them. The Holy Spirit and Jesus reside within us and we need to listen to their instructions to make progress in our ministry. The fish were large ones. We should try to catch the large ones: leaders of nations and other influential prominent people. The early Christian evangelists always tried to convert kings of the countries so that their subjects would then follow their example. For the first time ever, both the leaders of the USA and the UK are Catholic Christians. It will be interesting to see if they make any progress on protecting unborn children.

Jesus reinstated Peter by making confirm three times that he loved him more than anything else. Jesus instructed him to feed and take care of us (Jesus’ lambs and sheep). He did this three times to wipe out Peter’s three denials of Jesus. Jesus predicted that Peter would also be executed when he was old. Eventually, Peter would be crucified in Rome when it was ruled by the demonically deranged Emperor Nero. Peter insisted on being crucified upside-down as he did not feel worthy to be crucified in the same manner as Jesus.

As soon as Peter was reinstated and told to follow Jesus he, true to form, asked Jesus the wrong question. He enquired what would happen to John and Jesus told him to mind his own business.

John finished his gospel with the tantalising statement that Jesus did many other things as well that were not written down (John 21:25). He gave the impression that Jesus worked tirelessly, caring for others, teaching, healing and delivering. Only a few of his most spectacular miracles and vital teachings are recorded.

Since his resurrection and ascension into heaven, Jesus is present in the heart of every baptized Christian encouraging us and urging us to do good works as we follow him. His deeds have now increased exponentially as he is at work in billions of people’s hearts every day. There is no room in the whole world for all the books that would have to be written to record the good works that Christians have brought to the world for the glory of God.

Psalm 69:1-12

Without God we can sink in the miry depths.

We can be flooded with problems, stress and anxiety but God is our firm foothold and our faith in him will enable us to keep our heads above water.

We should always try to lead a life that will not disgrace our fellow Christians (Psalm 69:6).

As born-again Christians, we can feel the odd-one out in our families (Psalm 69:8). It is wonderful to enjoy fellowship at our local church to gain strength from fellow believers when the faith-vacuum of our own family members threatens to drain the life from us.

It is painful to hear people use the name of our Saviour as a swear-word. His name is above all other names and should only be spoken with respect.

Before our baptism, God knew every one of our sins (Psalm 69:5). However, thanks to Jesus’ blood, our sins have been wiped away and we can be spotless in the sight of God. However, to keep spotless we need to regularly examine our consciences and confess any new sins. God always has open arms wanting his prodigal sinning sons and daughters to return to him and ask for his mercy.

When Jesus kicked the money-changers out of the temple he was full of zeal: Psalm 69:9. We should always try to remain as energised and zealous as the day when we were born-again; this takes daily praise, worship and prayer in the Spirit.

Image: Raphael, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

David anointed King / Jesus Appears to his Disciples: June 1st 2021

2 Samuel 1:1-2:7

A man escaped from the Israelite camp and told David that Saul and his son Jonathan were dead. The man brought Saul’s crown and his arm-band with him. David and his men mourned, wept and fasted (2 Sam. 1:12). However, David was not comfortable about some aspects of the man’s story. The messenger admitted he was an Amalekite and David had just come back from slaughtering the Amalekites. He also claimed to have finished off the mortally wounded Saul, which was a lie, presumably to win favour with David. Even though Saul had frequently tried to kill him, David still respected God’s anointed king and did not approve of anyone lifting a sword against him (2 Sam. 1:14). David ordered that the hapless messenger should be killed in punishment for allegedly killing Saul.

David lamented the death of Saul and Jonathan: ‘How the mighty have fallen!’ (2 Sam. 1:19). He especially grieved for Jonathan. They had a pure loving friendship, which is exceedingly rare these days (2 Sam. 1:26). Jonathan had loved David as himself (1 Sam. 18:3). Jesus told us that we were to love our neighbour as ourselves (Matt. 22:37-39) and he demonstrated how God extended this type of love to the whole world.

Eventually, David asked the Lord whether he should visit Judah. God told him to go to Hebron. David took his wives and his men there and settled in Hebron and its towns. He was anointed king of Judah (2 Sam.2:4).

David sent an encouraging message to the town of Jabesh Gilead to thank them for burying Saul (2 Sam. 2:6-7).

The king of Israel was dead, long live David the king – just of Judah so far but it was a good start.

John 20:10-31

Mary Magdalene stayed at the tomb crying after Peter and John had gone back to their homes. Earlier in his ministry, Jesus had delivered Mary from a terrible demonic oppression and, as a result, she loved Jesus tremendously and was one of his most devoted followers. She was the sister of Lazarus and Martha and had previously wet Jesus’ feet with her tears (Luke 7:38), drying them with her hair. She had recently anointed his feet again in preparation for his burial in her own house in Bethany (John 12:3). We should all have a tender love for Jesus like Mary Magdalene had, being forever grateful that he has wiped away our sins and longing to spend time with him.

Mary looked inside the tomb and saw two angels sitting where Jesus’ body had been. They did not understand why she was crying. The knew about Jesus’ resurrection and so expected the world to be rejoicing. Turning around, she thought the gardener was standing there but it was Jesus. Jesus’ first word after being resurrected was ‘Mary’ (John 20:16). Jesus knows us all as individuals and calls out our names so we can come to him and be saved.

Jesus reiterated that we can now call God our Father. We are brothers and sisters of Jesus, co-heirs with Christ (John 20:17). Mary joyfully took this good news back to the disciples. She had seen the resurrected living Lord.

The disciples had locked themselves in. They were quaking ‘for fear of the Jews’ (John 20:19). They weren’t going to get far in spreading the gospel with this attitude and so Jesus appeared to them and breathed on them to give them the Holy Spirit (John 20:22). The Holy Spirit at Pentecost would later empower them to become supercharged, powerful apostles. At our baptism, which might have happened to us as infants, we receive both the Holy Spirit and a supernatural seal on our hearts flagging that we belong to God. However, this small deposit of the Holy Spirit may not burst into flames and energise us until we experience our own personal Pentecost – the ‘baptism of the Holy Spirit’. We need to pray directly to the Holy Spirit, in the name of Jesus, on a daily basis and ask him to fire up all his gifts within us so we can be the best witness we can be to the Lord Jesus Christ for the glory of God.

The disciples were overjoyed to see Jesus again. Jesus took away their terror and gave them peace (John 20:19). He was sending them out into the world, once he had empowered them with the Holy Spirit. just as the Father had sent him (John 20:21).

Jesus told them that if they forgave anyone their sins, they would be forgiven (John 20:23). From this comes the tradition of the Mother Church of believers confessing to a priest their sins so that he will grant them absolution on account of his spiritual authority handed down in an unbroken chain from the first apostles through the laying on of hands. It is wonderful to hear these holy words: ‘God the Father of mercies, through the death and resurrection of his Son has reconciled the world to himself and sent the Holy Spirit among us for the forgiveness of sins; through the ministry of the Church may God give you pardon and peace, and I absolve you from your sins in the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.‘ It is like receiving a loving embrace from our Father:

Other denominations teach that you can ask God the Father directly for absolution but that would be missing out the human mediation that Jesus stipulated in John 20:23, Matthew 16:19 and Matthew 18:18. The Mother Church teaches that we can ask God directly for absolution in exceptional circumstances – immediate danger of death or a global pandemic – but we have to ask him with ‘perfect contrition’, rather than just a fear of hell, and promise to visit a priest as soon as circumstances allow. Perfect contrition is ‘sorrow for sin arising from perfect love. In perfect contrition the sinner detests sin more than any other evil, because it offends God, who is supremely good and deserving of all human lovehttps://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/dictionary/index.cfm?id=35519

‘Doubting’ Thomas missed Jesus’ appearance and refused to believe it happened. A week later, though the doors were locked Jesus came again and stood among the disciples. He told Thomas to stop doubting and believe. As full recognition and faith dawned, Thomas uttered the beautiful phrase: ‘My Lord and my God!’ (John 20:27-28). We should be able to say this with heartfelt thanks when we consider how many times God has rescued us during our lives. Jesus will forgive us too for having doubts. He will demonstrate time and again in our lives that it is not fate, karma or good luck that steers our lives. Jesus is walking with us demonstrating his constant love for us.

We are particularly blessed when we believe based on hearing the gospel alone rather than having to see Jesus with our own eyes (John 20:29).

Jesus did many other miraculous signs in the presence of his disciples. John listed a sufficient number of major miracles in his gospel for us to believe that Jesus was the Son of God.

Belief is a simple choice. I can turn on the TV, watch the news and choose to believe the newscaster. Similarly, we can choose to believe the Bible and the two thousands years of Christian witness. martyrdom and teaching since it was written or think we know better through foolish pride. Belief leads to eternal life. Choosing not to believe leads to eternal separation from God. It really shouldn’t be a difficult decision but the spirit of unbelief is rampant in the world at the moment – just consider how fairly sensible people have refused to believe scientists about the Covid pandemic and made a fuss about social distancing and wearing masks. God solves problems these days through people. He inspired scientists to produce a miracle vaccine. We just have to choose to believe in his provenance.

By believing, we will have life in his name (John 20:31).

Proverbs 13:20-14:4

We should pick our company carefully (Prov.13:20).

Many of the great heroes in the Bible: Abraham, Jacob, Joseph, David, Daniel were wealthy men. The righteous will receive a reward (Prov. 13:21). We are all righteous in the sight of God due to Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross and so we can claim our reward of prosperity.

Poverty isn’t a blessing. We want to be able to help future generations of our family (Prov. 13:22).

Injustice in the world keeps people poor. We should fight for social justice to lift people out of poverty.

God loves us and so will discipline us and allow us to go through trials to refine us like silver, give us endurance, makes us stronger and build our character. No test, no worthwhile testimony.

Devious people despise the Lord (Prov. 14:2). Christians respect his awesome power and love.

Image: National Gallery of Art, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

David Destroys the Amalekites / Jesus’ Empty Tomb: May 31st 2021

The Philistine commanders questioned the loyalty of David. He had killed many Philistines in his time from their champion, Goliath, to the two hundred he had slaughtered just to harvest their foreskins. Achish, the Philistine king, was pleased with David (1 Samuel 29: 9) but instructed him not to go into battle with them and turn back to the land of the Philistines. This was fortuitous. David was destined to be the ruler of Israel and so it was sensible for him not to have the blood of Israelites on his hands.

David returned to the Philistine town where he lived, Ziklag, only to find that the evil Amalekites had raided it in his absence, set it on fire and carried off all their families including David’s two wives. David’s men talked about stoning him because he had left their families unprotected.

David asked the Lord, utilising the ephod (priestly apron), whether he should pursue the Amalekites and God told him he would be successful in this rescue mission. David and his six hundred men set off in pursuit but he had to leave two hundred men at a ravine because they were exhausted. David found an escaped slave, gave him food and drink and he then led them to the Amalekite raiders.

David fought the Amalekites, rescued all his people and took their flocks and herds. Some of his men did not want to share the spoils of their battle with the two hundred exhausted men who had not fought but David over-ruled them and gave everyone an equal share (1 Samuel 30:24-25). David also shared some of the plunder with the elders of Judah and all the other places who had been kind to David while he roamed in the desert.

In summary, God stopped David from attacking the Israelites which would have looked very bad on his CV. David then started acting in a much more regal and responsible fashion. He asked God what he should do. He bravely went off to rescue his subjects. He fed and sheltered a refugee. He nearly wiped out one of God’s least favourite nations. He was kind to all his people – even the exhausted ones who could not fight. He was generous with his resources in order to forge closer alliances with friendly neighbours. This was a very promising chapter in David’s gradual development just as Saul is about to meet his demise.

The Philistines fought against Israel and all Saul’s sons were killed, including David’s best friend Jonathan. Saul was critically injured and fell on his own sword. The Israelites abandoned their towns and fled. It was a total slaughter, which God had sensibly kept David from participating in. The Philistines put the armour of Saul in the temple of their demonic fertility deity. They fastened his headless body, and the bodies of his sons, to the wall of a town called Beth Shan. Despite the danger, the Israelites from Jabesh Gilead were not prepared to accept this final insult to their king and they valiantly journeyed through the night to retrieve the bodies, cremate them and bury them. They then fasted seven days out of respect.

The first king of Israel, Saul, had died. He had started well but fell out with God due to his disobedience and eventually plunged to a new low in spiritual relations by consulting a witch. However, even people he unjustly persecuted, like David, had still respected him. The Israelites were grieved to see him go despite his faults. Both Saul and his son Jonathan were tremendous warriors and they were loved and gracious (2 Sam. 1:23). Israel would now enter a period of civil war to determine the next unifying king of Israel.

John 19:28-20:9

Jesus, while suffering on the cross, was given a drink of vinegar, which fulfilled the prophecy in Psalms 69.21.

When Jesus died, he made us righteous in the sight of God by taking all our past, present and future sins on him. He became sin for our salvation and broke its power: ‘It is finished’. Jesus breathed out his spirit as he died (John 19:30). Jesus’ spirit now lives within all baptised and believing Christians.

To check he was dead, the soldiers pierced Jesus’ side and there was ‘a sudden flow of blood and water’ (John 19:34). Crucifixion is a horrible death and during the process: ‘the decreased oxygen (due to the difficulty in exhaling) causes damage to the tissues and the capillaries begin leaking watery fluid from the blood into the tissues. This results in a build-up of fluid around the heart (pericardial effusion) and lungs (pleural effusion)’. Jesus probably literally died from a broken heart as the lack of oxygen in the body of a victim of crucifixion can cause the heart to burst. Jesus had been betrayed by the people he had come to save. Even though he revealed God to us as the God of love and he never sinned, he died due to our sin / envy / jealousy and hatred.

https://www.apu.edu/articles/the-science-of-the-crucifixion/#:~:text=When%20they%20came%20to%20Jesus,surrounding%20the%20heart%20and%20lungs.

The blood and water from Jesus’ side fell onto the ground of Golgotha and soaked Adam’s buried bones. Jesus’ life was in the blood. Jesus told us the Holy Spirit, now living within us, would give us streams of living water. ‘The water flowing from the heart of Jesus will heal, cleanse and energise us all’ (NG, p.317) Jesus would then descend into hell and rescue his old friends, Adam and Eve, from their chains.

Jesus’ body was taken by his uncle, Joseph of Arimathea. He and Nicodemus wrapped Jesus’ body with spices (myrrh and aloes) in strips of linen and laid his body in a new tomb.

On the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene found that the stone had been removed from the entrance to the tomb. She told Simon Peter and John and they both ran to the tomb.

Simon Peter saw the strips of linen that had covered Jesus’ body lying there as well as ‘the burial cloth that had been around Jesus’ head’ (John 20:7). This cloth has been preserved through the millennia as a holy relic and is known as the ‘Sudarium of Oviedo’. Both the Shroud of Turin – the cloth that wrapped up Jesus’ body and the Sudarium – the cloth that covered his head prior to the shroud – have been proved to have been in contact with each other and both have traces of myrrh and aloes on them.

Simon Peter ‘saw and believed’ (John 20:8). We are especially blessed these days when we believe without seeing (John 20:29).

Psalm 68:28-35

When we pray with faith and pray in the Spirit, God will show us his healing and delivering strength.

As the gospel has spread to the ends of the earth, the global faithful have sung praise to God.

We need to continue to proclaim God’s awesome power (Psalm 68:34).

The awesome Holy Spirit resides inside of us on account of our baptism. He gives power and strength to us, his people. To release his power through us, we must pray he blesses us with a full measure of gifts and pray in faith for others (Ps. 68:35).

Image: https://pixabay.com/photos/empty-tomb-nazareth-israel-3326100/

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