The Gibeonites avenged / Simon the Sorcerer / Philip and the Ethiopian: June 13th 2021

2 Samuel 20:1-21:22

Another rebellion started. The fickle men of Israel deserted David again. This time, to follow Sheba, son of Bicri. The men of Judah stayed loyal to King David.

King David returned to his palace in Jerusalem. He took the ten concubines, whom Absalom had slept with in his absence, and confined them as widows for the rest of their lives. This was not the best day for women’s rights in the Old Testament. However, David obviously felt a duty of care towards these women. Concubines were often slaves, who had been selected to provide powerful men with pleasure and additional heirs but they did not have the same rights as official wives. It wasn’t until the 14th and 15th centuries that the Christian church outlawed concubinage throughout its territories.

The King told his new army commander, Amasa, to leave and assemble the men of Judah and return within three days. Amasa took longer than this. They couldn’t wait and so sent out David’s personal troops to chase Sheba the rebel before he escaped. Joab, who had recently been replaced as military commander, met Amasa at the great rock in Gibeon. Joab greeted him in a deceptively friendly matter before murdering him with a dagger. Joab was determined to get his old job back.

All the troops then followed Joab in the pursuit of Sheba. They besieged the fugitive in the city of Abel Beth Maacah and started to batter the city wall to bring it down. A wise woman negotiated with Job and persuaded the citizens to cut off Sheba’s head and threw it down to Joab. Another threat to David’s reign was dead. Joab withdrew his troops from the city and they dispersed and went home. Joab went back to king David as commander over Israel’s entire army. I wonder what he told David in regards to Amasa’s death: ‘He slipped and fell on his own dagger’.

There was a famine for three years and David asked God why this was occurring. The Lord replied that it was because of Saul putting the Gibeonites to death. David was not personally responsible but the country was suffering for this historical treachery. During the Exodus, the Israelites had promised to spare the Gibeonites, who were survivors of the Amorites, but Saul had tried to annihilate them. It was up to the present king to make amends.

David asked the Gibeonites how Israel could make amends: (2 Sam.21:4). The Gibeonites asked for seven of Saul’s male descendants to be handed over to them to be killed. The king spared Saul’s grandson Mephibosheth because of his vow to take care of him but handed over seven other sons of Saul. The Gibeonites killed them, and exposed their bodies on a hill. David brought the bones of Saul and his son Jonathan from Jabesh Gilead to be buried in the tomb of Saul’s father and gathered up the bones of the other sons of the Saul who had recently been killed. After that, God started to answer prayer again that was offered to him on behalf of the nation.

This shows the importance of world leaders making reparations for past crimes / genocides and other atrocities. God remembers historical offenses against him and can block communication with countries many years later until they apologise and make amends. Our UK leaders will eventually have to apologise for the six million unborn children killed in this county since the 1967 Abortion act.

David went to war against the Philistines again. David was getting on in years and became exhausted by the battle. He was therefore in no fit state to fight another giant. David had defeated the enormous Goliath in his youth. Goliath had been nine feet nine inches tall and had worn scale armour that weighed 125 pounds. Goliath’s spearhead had weighed a massive 15-16 pounds. Now David faced another giant, Ishbi-benob, who was probably smaller than Goliath as his spear head was half the weight. David had to be rescued by Abishai who struck down the giant and killed him. The giants, who had allied themselves with the Philistines, were descended from the mysterious Nephilim / Anakim. David had been so close to losing his life that his army banned him from fighting with them again (2 Sam.21:17).

https://knowingscripture.com/articles/giants-in-the-land-a-biblical-theology-of-the-nephilim-anakim-rephaim-and-goliath

The Israelites killed another three giants in battles with the Philistines at Gog and Gatha (2 Sam.21:22). The Israelites were gradually completing the extermination of the giants that Joshua had started but had failed to complete. The race of giants may have been formed by an unholy union between fallen angels and human woman and so they needed to be eliminated. I think this was more like IVF / genetical manipulation as I don’t believe demons can create eggs or sperm of their own. However, the genes from the Nephilim / Anakim descendants had infected much of humanity. Another reason why God might have wanted Canaanite tribes to be completely wiped out rather than be allowed to breed with Israelites.

Acts 8:4-40

The persecution of the early Christians resulted in them scattering throughout the known world. They preached the gospel wherever they went and so the church grew exponentially. Philip found himself in Samaria and there was great joy there because people were healed and evil spirits came out of many. Because Philip demonstrated the truth of the word through the powerful healings that accompanied him people paid close attention to what he said (Acts 8:6-7).

Simon the Sorcerer had made himself famous in Samaria through his demonic magic. He believed in Philip’s teaching and was baptized. He followed Philip everywhere (Acts 8:13).

Peter and John were sent to Samaria as well when they heard about the success of Philip’s missionary work. They found that even though Samaritans had been baptized ‘in the name of the Lord Jesus’, the Holy Spirit had not yet come down upon any of them (Acts 8:15-16). Peter and John placed their hands on them and they received the Holy Spirit (Acts 8:17). This is fascinating because the Mother Church teaches that everyone baptized in the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit receives the Holy Spirit and becomes a child of God. However, the great majority of Christians show no outward signs that the Holy Spirit is within them. He might just exist within them as a tiny seed, a little flickering pilot light that is never ignited. We only see evidence of the Holy Spirit when these baptized people fully accept Jesus into their lives, become obedient to God and ask the Holy Spirit to enkindle in them his fire and his gifts. Then people start to become fully alive in Christ and start to show evidence of supernatural gifts such as praying in the Spirit.

Pentecostals typically baptize adults – who have fully accepted Jesus into their lives by earnestly saying ‘The Sinner’s Prayer’. They often exhibit the gifts of the Holy Spirit from the moment they are baptized. Some people have the gift of praying for others to receive the gifts of the Holy Spirit. The evangelist Ros Powell once prayed for a group of people including me at a conference to receive an additional supernatural prayer language. As soon as she prayed and touched us on the forehead, we each started to speak in a new language. Simon the sorcerer wanted this power and offered the apostle’s money so that he could lay hands on people to receive the Holy Spirit (Acts 8:18-19). Simon might have had good motives but he also may have seen this as a money-making opportunity. Even today, religious people still make money selling blessed articles or holy objects which is a grave sin known as ‘Simony’ after Simon the Sorcerer. As Christians, we have been given blessings and power as free gifts and we have to freely pass these onto others. It is fine for churches to sell manmade statues or medals or other mementoes but as soon as they have been officially blessed by a priest or deacon and become imbued with holy power, they can never be sold again. We should stay away from anyone who wants to charge for religious services.

Peter rebuked Simon severely (Acts 8:20-23) and told him to repent. Simon asked Peter to pray for him.

Peter and John returned to Jerusalem after testifying and proclaiming the word of God.

Philip was told by an angel to go South where he met an Ethiopian eunuch. The Holy Spirit instructed Philip to go to the eunuch’s chariot and stay near it. Philip offered to explain the passage in Isaiah that the eunuch was reading which was all about Jesus (Acts 8:32). This scripture reading provided the perfect opening for Philip to tell the Ethiopian the good news about Jesus.

The Ethiopian saw some water and seized the opportunity to be baptized. This is how we should be with every spiritual gift. If someone is offering us the chance to receive a special prayer or a blessing at the altar we should seize it. I met a senior freemason the other day. He was shuffling his way in agony across the car park outside a doctor’s surgery. Satan had riddled his body so badly with arthritis that he could barely move. Every step was agony. I offered to pray for him but he rejected my offer! He said he didn’t have enough time, even though I could have followed behind him and prayed a dozen times before he finished his tortuous journey to the car. Some people are so damaged, they require our prayers just to give them the desire to be prayed for.

Philip baptized the eunuch who went away rejoicing to spread the gospel throughout Ethiopia. Philip was then mysteriously transported by the Holy Spirit to the city of Azotus. The Holy Spirit wanted the gospel to spread so fast that he was in effect teleporting an apostle around the region. Thanks to the blessings of the internet today, our evangelism can be spread throughout the world at the speed of light.

Proverbs 14:25-25

Our respect for our awesome God will give us a secure fortress and is our fountain of life.

‘Envy rots the bones’ – we should try to have a heart at peace (Prov.14:30) that does not lust after our neighbour’s belongings.

The Holy Spirit will give us patience, wisdom and understanding. As Christians we stand up for the truth and a truthful witness can save lives through their testimony.

Jesus made us righteous through his death on the cross and so we have an everlasting refuge in God (Prov.14:32).

Image: Uoaei1, CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

David Mourns for his Son / The Stoning of Stephen: June 12th 2021

2 Samuel 18:19-19:43

Ahiamaaz, son of Zadok, was keen to take the news of Absalom’s death to King David. However, Joab, the commander of David’s army, who had organised the killing of David’s son knew this would not be well received. He asked a dispensable Cushite to deliver the news instead. Joab knew that David had executed bearers of similar news on previous occasions and so it wasn’t a desirable task (2 Sam.18:22).

Ahiamaaz outran the Cushite but didn’t plainly tell David about Absalom’s death. The Cushite caught up and told David about his son’s fate. As Joab had predicted. David did not take the news well but at least he didn’t kill the messengers (2 Sam.18:33).

David wept and mourned for his son – the same son who had betrayed him and wanted him dead. Even though they had won a great victory, his army felt ashamed of their actions. Joab was furious and told David that he had humiliated his men: ‘You love those who hate you and hate those who love you’ (2 Sam.19:6-7). He told David to go and encourage his loyal men or there would be terrible consequences for his rule. To his credit, David accepted this valid criticism and realised his ingratitude. His men had loyally risked their lives for him and he sat down in front of his men (2 Sam.19:8).

It had been a very strange attempted coup. Both sides had been quite civil to each other. King David was generally liked as a monarch and there wasn’t an urgent need to replace him apart from his son having better hair and being slightly more popular. King David didn’t want his son harmed even though he had almost lost his throne to him. The whole affair had left the citizens of Israel and Judah very confused and in conflict with each other.

King David won the hearts of all the men of Judah again and they asked him and his men to return. They met him at the ford over the Jordan to welcome him home. Even Shimei, who had previously shouted curses at David, came to apologise. One of David’s retinue, Abishai, wanted to put Shimei to death for his sins but David rebuked him (2 Sam:19:22) in a similar way to Jesus rebuking James and John for wanting to call down fire from heaven on a Samaritan village (Luke 9:54-55). David graciously pardoned Shimei.

Saul’s grandson, Mephibosheth, also came to meet David. He explained that he had wanted to travel with David but had been betrayed by Ziba, his servant. David had earlier given Ziba all of Mephibosheth’s fields but on hearing this version of events ordered that they should be split equally. Mephibosheth said he didn’t want any land. He was just happy to see David home safely.

David wanted to repay his ally, Barzillai, for his support but he wouldn’t allow this. David blessed him instead and allowed him to return home. When David crossed over the Jordan, he was accompanied by all the men of Judah but just half the troops of Israel. This caused a large argument between Judah and Israel over who had more of a claim on David.

David was back in charge over a divided kingdom with the two major divisions bickering with each other. David had shown love for those who cursed and attacked him (Absalom and Shimei), he had demonstrated forgiveness of his enemies (the troops of Israel) and taken on board valid criticism (Joab). David had patiently listened to people’s apologies and excuses (Mephibosheth and Shimei) and he had blessed his friends (Barzillai and Kimham). However, he had punished those who had not followed his instructions. He had appointed the leader of the rebel army, Amasa, as commander of his army in place of Job (2 Sam.19:13). Job had stopped the civil war by killing David’s son but this was in defiance of David’s explicit instructions.

Just as God had punished Saul for not quite following his instructions, David was prepared to remove people who did not show complete obedience. David was a master politician and had managed to negotiate a return to his kingdom but he still had much work to do to reunite the nation.

Acts 7:44-8:3

Stephen finished his history of the Jewish nation with the devastating conclusion: ‘However, the Most High does not live in houses made by men’ (Acts 7:48). God was not confined just to the Jewish temple, with just the religious elite allowed to communicate with him once a year. Ezekiel had demonstrated in earlier scripture that when the Israelites had been exiled by the Babylonians, God had travelled with them. God is everywhere and in everything (Acts 7:50) and now, through the Holy Spirit, he is powerfully active within every individual Christian.

Stephen suddenly launched a verbal assault on the Sanhedrin. He even disowned them, calling their ancestors ‘your fathers’ rather than ‘our forefathers’ as he had done earlier. Their ancestors had persecuted all the prophets and had now betrayed and murdered the Righteous One (Acts 7:52). They had not obeyed the law and so, according to their own laws, should die. They would do so if they carried on being stiff-necked, resisting the Holy Spirit and Jesus’ invitation to eternal life through baptism and belief in him.

The Sanhedrin were furious. Truth is often unpopular. Stephen wasn’t bothered. He was full of the Holy Spirit. God was actually now living in him but his persecutors did not recognise God right in front of their furious faces. Stephen was consoled by a wonderful vision of Jesus standing at the right hand of God. Stephen was soon to join Jesus in heaven as he was stoned to death and became the first Christian martyr. Stephen prayed that their sin should not be held against them (Acts 7:60) just as Jesus prayed ‘Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing’ (Luke 23:34).

A young man, Saul, approved of Stephen’s death. He wanted to persecute and murder all Christians. He would shortly undergo one of the most dramatic transformations in the history of Christianity.

Persecution broke out and all, except the apostles, were scattered (Acts 8:1). Wherever the disciples fled, they preached the gospel and converted many.

God frustrates the plans of evil people. They had hoped to eliminate the church through persecution but their efforts forced the disciples to travel and evangelise; this made the church grow much faster than if they had been left in peace. It must have been distressing for the early Christians to flee from their homes but the miracles, signs, wonders and fruitfulness that the Holy Spirit worked through them brought consolation. ‘We know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose (Romans 8:28).

Psalm 73:1-14

If we are not careful, we can start to ask ourselves why we bother to be Christians. Why do we suffer the abuse, hassle and pain of being ignored? Is it all in vain?

Non-believers can appear to be more prosperous, more confident, carefree and proud about their healthy and strong bodies.

However, envy is a major sin. We need to count the priceless blessings that God has given us throughout our lives. Our treasure is an everlasting treasure in heaven (Matt.6:19-20).

We should not become like the wicked who scoff and speak with malice (Ps.73:8). ‘From their callous hearts comes iniquity; the evil conceits of their minds know no limits’ (Ps.73:7).

Our destinies will be completely different. The wicked are on slippery ground and will suddenly be destroyed (Ps.73:18-19). In contrast, we will enter the sanctuary of God.

No matter how poorly we seem to be faring relative to the secular values of the consumerist world, when the Holy Spirit lives within us we have eternal joy in our hearts which can never be shaken: (Galatians 5:22). We should share with the world our testimony of his glorious deeds.

God will eternally be our refuge and our strength.

Image: ChristianeB, CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

David fights the Arameans / Peter and John Heal a Man Crippled from Birth: June 6th 2021

2 Samuel 9:1-10:19

David tracked down his deceased friend Jonathan’s disabled son. David was determined to show kindness to someone from the house of Saul for Jonathan’s sake.

Jonathan’s son was called Mephibosheth and David restored to him the land of his grandfather, Saul, and allowed him to always eat at his table.

It is wonderful to spend time considering if there is someone we can help out / be kind to and get on and do it.

The king of the Ammonites died and David sent a delegation to express his sympathy to his son. The Ammonite nobles accused the visiting Israelites of being spies and assaulted them disrespectfully (2 Sam.10:4). The Ammonites realised this had angered David and they hired mercenaries to bolster their army. David sent Joab and his entire army of fighting men against them.

The hired men, Arameans, fled in front of the Israelite army. They eventually regrouped and engaged Israel in battle. David’s army killed a huge number of them (2 Sam.10:18) including the commander of their army. This made smaller nations make peace with the Israelites out of respect for them and the Arameans were too afraid to help the Ammonites any more.

Acts 3:1-26

A man crippled from birth asked Peter and John for money. He didn’t even look at them. He didn’t realise that they, out of all the people passing him by, were now adopted sons of God with the power to heal him. Peter commanded the man to look at them (Acts 3:4). The man finally gave them his attention, expecting to get something from them.

Peter said he didn’t have any money ‘but what I have I give you. In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, walk’ (Acts 3:6-7). Peter helped the man up and instantly his feet and ankles became strong. The man had never walked for his whole life but was now able to walk, jump and praise God. It was an outstanding miracle and shows that we, as baptized spirit-filled disciples, can also pray powerfully for healing ‘in the name of Jesus’. A crown of onlookers acknowledged the man’s healing and were filled with wonder and amazement.

The place where the healing took place was a temple gate called ‘Beautiful’. Peter and John had seen the beauty in a man created by God, even though he needed healing. The crowd saw the beauty of Jesus’ healing power changing someone’s life for ever. We can encounter someone that needs healing wherever we may travel. The Holy Spirit might whisper to us that we should walk up a different street than usual or go somewhere at a certain time in order to meet someone we can help. Let us boldly seize the chance and not walk on by. A friend of mine specialised in healing strangers in supermarkets. He marched up to a lady one day in the vegetable aisle and said: ‘I can see you have a problem with your leg. I am a Christian, may I pray for you.’ Most people are very grateful for the offer. Everyone likes attention. The lady replied: ‘I didn’t know that I had any problem with my leg but please go ahead anyway’.

Peter asked the crowd why this miracle surprised them. It was not the disciples’ own power or godliness that had healed the man but the authority of Jesus’ name and the faith that comes through him (Acts 3:16). Peter reminded the crowd that they had disowned the Holy and Righteous One and killed the author of life (Acts 3: 14-15). So many people in our society today still disown Jesus and allow a murderer, the devil, free access to take up residence within them. The crowd in Jerusalem had acted out of ignorance but modern people are far more guilty. Most are not ignorant of the gospel, they just ignore it and refuse to believe in active rebellion against God.

Peter urged the crowd to repent and turn to God so that their sins would be wiped out (Acts 3:19). When we finally turn to God and become ‘born again’ our whole body and spirit will be refreshed.

Jesus will physically remain in heaven until the time comes for God to restore everything (Acts 3:21) but he spiritually lives in the hearts of all born-again Christians.

Moses had prophesied that Jesus would be raised up from the Jews. All the prophets, from Samuel on, had foretold the appearance of Christ (Acts 3:24). Jesus wants to turn all of us from our wicked ways through the power and encouragement of the Holy Spirit.

Jesus is descended from the original patriarch, Abraham, because God had promised him: ‘Through your offspring all peoples on earth will be blessed’ (Acts 3:25).

Psalm 70:1-5

We can pray for God to hasten to save us. He is our help and our deliverer (Ps.70:5).

Jesus taught us to pray for our enemies (Romans 12:14) in contrast to King David who often wanted his enemies to be shamed / confused and disgraced. However, God will make sure that justice is delivered (Romans 12:19-21).

King David prayed that all who seek God will rejoice and be glad in him.

I love the kind salvation that God has given me and so I proclaim, with David, ‘Let God be exalted!’ (Ps.70:4).

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_apostles_Peter_and_John_heal_the_lame_man._Photomechanic_Wellcome_V0034960.jpg

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